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Opinion

  • At the national level, name calling and threats against the noble pursuit of journalism have dominated the space for much of this year.
    The threat of tariffs enforced to benefit one lone employer helped throw a newsprint landscape already being decimated through the loss of print advertising into deeper chaos.
    And then there’s the rhetoric coming from the West Wing of the White House in Washington, D.C. “Enemies of the people,” the president has said repeatedly. The enemies he’s referring to? Media.

  • BY RANDY BEHYMER | Wealth Management

  • BY PEGGY TRINKLE | Regent, John-Guill Polly Hawkins Craig Chapter NSDAR

  • BY STATE SEN. JULIAN CARROLL

  • Editor:
    I would like to commend the 911 operator and Owen County EMS for their assistance on the evening of Nov. 6. My husband woke up experiencing neck, shoulder and arm pain before becoming unresponsive. I have never experienced such panic and fear in my life. However, the 911 operator was amazing as she dispatched Owen County EMS.

  • Editor:
    On behalf of the living soldiers and families of those soldiers now deceased, that were members of “A” Battery 2nd BN138th FA Carrollton National guard, we want to express how grateful we are for the community support of our reunion Oct. 14, 2017.

  • Judge Thomas Funk

    Guest Columnist

  • from The News Enterprise

  • By Chris Kenning
    The Courier-Journal
    Donald Trump’s rhetoric about election rigging and voter fraud might not sound so far-fetched to residents of Clay County, Ky.
    In 2010, a handful of locals including a former circuit judge were convicted in a scheme that included vote-buying and changing votes at polling machines, fraud that the FBI said impacted the outcome of local elections.

  • Who will pass on the stories of our ancestors? Who will embrace the variegated colors of everyday life and leave a memorably written record of the past?
    The responsibility of sharing someone’s life story belongs to family members, friends and all those who realize the treasure of the past and its impact on the future.
    Many delightful and moving stories of Owen countians are recalled and recorded  in the “Owen County, Kentucky Family History Book,” available from the historical society for $60.

  • Congressional committees are jokingly referred to as the place where bills go to die.  However, I’m happy to report that my bipartisan bill to audit the Federal Reserve passed the House Oversight and Government Reform committee by unanimous consent this summer, and is now eligible to come before the full House for a vote.  Since 90% of bills die in committee, you could say that my legislation had a near-death experience, but that’s a good thing.

  • In May 2015, I was like one of many college graduates that walked across the stage, shook hands with the dean, grasped the diploma cover and walked away. But I was one of the graduates that didn’t have life figured out. I had interviewed at several places both inside and outside of our particular company and didn’t have a full-time job lined up after graduation. The interviews and numerous job applications came to an end early in September when News-Herald Publisher Jeff Moore told me about this opening. It was a glimmer of light in what was otherwise a bleak summer.

  • Editor’s note: Owen County Judge-Executive Casey Ellis gave his second state of the county address July 14 at the Owen County Chamber of commerce breakfast meeting. The following is a transcription from a recording of the address.

  • We’ve reached a critical point in Kentucky – one where our prisons and jails are full, overdose deaths continue to rise and far too many children have parents who are imprisoned.

    We can no longer afford to cling to the outdated idea that prison is the only way to effectively hold people accountable for their crimes. Instead, we need to take a smarter, more measured approach to criminal justice.

  • “Oh! the old swimmin’-hole! In the long, lazy days

    When the humdrum of school made so many run-a-ways,

    How plesant was the jurney down the old dusty lane,

    Whare the tracks of our bare feet was all printed so plane

    You could tell by the dent of the heel and the sole

    They was lots o’ fun on hands at the old swimmin’-hole.” - James Whitcomb Riley

  • BY CASEY ELLIS
    Owen County Judge-Executive

    As we look forward to nicer weather, school being out for the summer and summer activities, I wanted to inform the citizens of Owen County about the road closure scheduled for June 1-30.

    There seems to be some confusion around this subject. The reality is one city block will be closed. That block is from the traffic light at East Adair to the Seminary Street traffic light (and just to the edge of the People’s Bank drive through).

  • You always hear of small town love, support and pride – but what does that really mean?

    Unlike John Mellencamp, I wasn’t born in a small town, but my family’s roots were pretty deep in one. Born and raised in Frankfort, we had the conveniences of more than a choice of either a burger or pizza and a bigger selection than the Dollar Store and Save-Way could provide.

    I guess I really didn’t understand it and fall into the mindset of loving the small-town atmosphere until I made Owen County my home in 2000.

  • I started my week in Frankfort in the presence of family, friends and my new colleagues in the Kentucky House of Representatives by holding my hand high and swearing an oath to represent the people of Scott, Owen, and Fayette counties to the very best of my ability.