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Today's News

  • January property transfers

    Ronald Scott Goodin and Darlene Goodin to Ronald Scott Goodin Jr., two parcels of land.
    Susan Jones to Ernest L. Ligon and Dana Ligon, lots 4 and 5 and 12 and 13. Eagle Creek Campground, $17,500.
    Norse Land Farm LLC to Freestone Foodbank Inc., five tracts of land in Owen County.
    Allen Grimes and Rosemary Grimes to Greg S. Grimes and Michele Grimes, tract 4, Literell Farm Division, $150,000.
    Peggie P. Tisch, Peggie Tisch Rollins and Michael D. Rollins to Bonnie L. Cooke, part number two in the subdivision. Parkway Addition, $61,500.

  • At the library: Feb. 14-Feb. 21

    Age Reversing Workout
     
    Follow this workout video to engage every muscle in your body, liberate your joints and improve your overall health. Miranda Esmonde-White leads a classical stretch workout everyone will enjoy at 11 a.m., today.   

  • Branch wildlife not the only ones ready for winter's end

    I’m running late this morning. My brain is on overload. Too many and too much “sports” over the weekend. I came home from church and turned on the golf game and watched that to the end, then got into the Olympic games. The sun finally came out, and it was in the 50s at some point in the afternoon. I had a skiff of snow on the ground when I got up this morning. You never know what you’re going to get weather-wise when you live in Kentucky.

  • 13th annual CHD Awareness Walk will be March 10

    BY KATIE COLUMBIA
    Special to The News-Herald

  • All victims of Highway 355 crash now identified

    UPDATE (4 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 8): Owen County Coroner Mark Garnett has identified the remaining victims in a crash that claimed three lives near the 16000 Block of Highway 355 Wednesday.

    64-year-old Dave Harrison and 63-year-old Sheryl Harrison, of Perry Park, were the victims of the vehicle that caught fire. Garnett said the married couple moved to Perry Park about two years ago from Minnesota. 

    We will continue to update this story as more information becomes available. 

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  • KICKIN’ GRASS

    When the balance sheet for the Owen County Youth Soccer League (OCYSL) recently began looking grim, longtime board member Mike Haines sought a way to assist the league as well as draw outsiders to the community.
    An avid Bluegrass fan, Haines set his sights on a benefit concert series — Kickin’ Grass Concerts — which will bring multi-Grammy nominated Bluegrass ensemble Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver to Owen County High School next month.

  • Mayor: No truth to resignation rumor

    After rumors of his resignation began circulating last week, Owenton Mayor David “Milkweed” Wotier set the record straight once and for all.
    “What I have said is I’m not going to seek re-election, I don’t know whether someone took that the wrong way – but my full intention is to fill out this term,” Wotier said Sunday.

  • ‘Service Above Self’ for some OCHS students

    “Service Above Self” is a motto many Owenton Rotarians have learned well and now Owen County High School students are getting the same lesson with the creation of the Interact Club.
    Interact Club is an independent club based on the Rotary Club, which focuses on the motto of “Service Above Self.” While the Interact Club does focus on that same motto, it also includes a much more youth-focused mentality.

  • A tornado is a tough way to get a death-clean done

    Whenever her adult children got on her nerves, my friend Pat would threaten never to clean out another closet. She’d just leave them to deal with her lifetime of clutter after she was gone, she said, and see how they’d like that! I thought of Pat when I read recently about the Swedes and their obsession with death-cleaning. Apparently, the Swedes feel a moral obligation to empty their homes of all but the bare necessities before they die. Apparently, their adult children never get on their nerves.

  • Old newspaper articles give glimpse into Owen’s past

    They were just ordinary everyday folks. Some lived in large cities; others resided in small towns or on isolated farms. Yet, for one brief moment in time they stood in the limelight, and their stories, some delightfully crafted to evoke laughter, others to awaken memories of long ago, became memorialized in newspaper articles, family histories and community narratives.