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Today's News

  • Kay's Branch News | Farmers take advantage of last week's dry days

    It’s overcast this morning after a week or so of sunshine. During that week all the farmers around here got their hay cut, dried, raked and baled. That is almost a miracle. It only happens about one year out of every six in this part of Kentucky.
    Wanda said she raked hay for Ray all day Wednesday. She said this was the first time she had attempted this chore, but she got it done while Ray came behind her and baled. They got it all into the barn on Friday. I drove into Owenton late last week, and everybody along the road was doing the same job.  

  • Is a matching 401k plan better than a company pension?

    BY RANDY BEHYMER | Wealth Management

  • Honor the flag on Flag Day and every day

    BY PEGGY TRINKLE | Regent, John-Guill Polly Hawkins Craig Chapter NSDAR

  • 5 bits of wisdom to the graduating class of 2018

    The year I graduated high school just happened to coincide with the emergence of a particular brood of cicadas. I had longed for a party in my parents' side yard under a towering ash tree to celebrate my entrance into adulthood. Sadly, the foul odor of dead cicadas canvassing our yard crushed my dreams. All summer long, buzzards swooped down into our yard to feast on the cicadas, and not too long after that, the once-beautiful ash tree became victim to the ash borer beetle.

  • MEET THE CANDIDATES: Owen County Sheriff's Democratic primary race

    GARY W. ALCORN
    Age: 49
    Occupation: Police officer
    Education: Currently working to complete an associate’s degree in criminal justice; 18-week academy at EKU and 40 hours of additional training each year
    Immediate family: Sebastian Alcorn, son; Taryn Alcorn, daughter
    Previous elected offices held: None

  • A bittersweet goodbye

    From her office at Owen County Upper Elementary School, Principal Sharen Hubbard presses an infant-sized, monogrammed onesie against her chest. The onesie — a gift from a staff member for her future grandson — serves as a gentle reminder of why this school year will be her last.
    Hubbard began considering retirement last year but said recent decisions related to public education by lawmakers in Frankfort and the pregnancy of her only child, Lindsay, cinched the deal.

  • Store owner removes synthetic drugs from shelves

    Controversial items such as U-Pass, a brand of synthetic urine that can allegedly be used to pass a drug test, were recently removed from the shelves of the Owenton Marathon Station, also known as Cowboys.
    The station, located at 105 S. Main St., began selling items like U-Pass and synthetic cannabinoids, an alternative to marijuana, earlier this year. When local residents began noticing the items, they took to Facebook to express their concerns, with one post garnering nearly 170 comments and more than 100 shares on the social media website.

  • Kay's Branch News | A beautiful start to May on the Branch

    It’s beautiful out this morning. The sun is shining and melting the frost off my front yard. Yes, it’s May, and I still see frost. That’s always the way when you live in a valley — it’s the last place to get frost and the first place to get a freeze in the fall. But I’m not complaining, the sun is shining this morning, and all is well in my small part of the world.

  • Owen District Court | April 27, 2018

    April 27, 2018

    Ronald Lloyd Howard, 1984, flagrant non-support, preliminary hearing set for May 4.
    Ricky Maupin, 1984, contempt of court, to pay $100 a month.
    Jacob Robertson, 1974, flagrant non-support, contempt of court, preliminary hearing set for May 4.
    Jason Wade Walker, 1979, operating on a suspended or revoked operator’s license, failure to wear seat belt, no or expired registration plates, failure of owner to maintain required insurance, two counts of contempt of court, continued to May 11.

  • Orphans lend powerful narrative to American history

    The first orphanage in America was established in 1729 when Indians massacred settlers near Natchez, Miss. An orphanage was unusual during this time; most orphans in the 1700s were taken into homes of neighbors or relatives. There was no court or government involvement. Families and friends just took it upon themselves to take these children under their wing to be raised as part of the family.