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Today's Features

  • The first orphanage in America was established in 1729 when Indians massacred settlers near Natchez, Miss. An orphanage was unusual during this time; most orphans in the 1700s were taken into homes of neighbors or relatives. There was no court or government involvement. Families and friends just took it upon themselves to take these children under their wing to be raised as part of the family.

  • In 1935 President Franklin Roosevelt signed a law creating the Rural Electrification Administration to provide funding to local cooperatives that would distribute electricity.
    At that time Kentucky’s governor, A.B. “Happy” Chandler, was instrumental in securing electric power for the Commonwealth; and in 1937 a loan of $130,000 was approved for Owen County Rural Electric Co-Op to construct lines for 600 customers. Yet, as late as the mid-1930s nine out of 10 households in Kentucky were without electricity.

  • Saturday marks the opening of the 2018 statewide spring turkey season. Hunters will be allowed to harvest one male turkey or a turkey with a visible beard per day with a limit of two for the spring hunting season.
    Shooting hours for the 2018 spring season begins 30 minutes before sunrise and continues until 30 minutes past sunset.

  • Snow! We have another skiff of snow on the ground as I write this Monday morning. This is April; the trees are blooming, Keeneland is running. This is not snow time, but this is Kentucky. Anything can happen weather-wise. The ground was just drying up enough for some of us to get out and mow the yard. Ray got his done, and Fay said she mowed too, but the wind was too cold for me, and I have had skiffs of snow every morning, so I continue to sit and watch TV and hope it will be better tomorrow.

  • Like many 10 year olds the young Owen countian spent much of his spare time hunting squirrels. One day while hunting these wily little tree climbers, the boy ducked under a tree branch, and as he cast his eyes to the ground, he spied a perfectly formed arrowhead. That discovery of a single ancient artifact set Owen countian Bobby Rose on the path of a life-long journey into the world of stone points, axes and pipes and fueled his determination to preserve these ancient treasures of the past.

  • This has been a good week for me. I got to play bridge Tuesday. The sun was shining, and I could see spring just around the corner — then it snowed on Wednesday and burst my bubble. There was a good crowd at church Sunday. The new furnace was doing its job, and everybody was glad to be back in their pews.
    Fay said attendance was good at her church too. She has been staying with her sister Sue some this week. She is bedfast now. Fay has been doing some cooking for her and helping the nurse that looks after her. Their family needs your prayers.

  • The little pedal organ, poised as if ready to share a melodious hymn,  stands in a small niche in the parlor of the Owen County Historical Society Museum. Many years ago its keys, now yellowed with age, rejoiced at the touch of the small fingers gliding up and down its keyboard.
    In the early 1900s, this unique little gospel organ traveled in the buggy of Owen County evangelist John Allie Lee. Reverend Lee’s daughter, Snowdye, accompanied her father and played hymns calling the faithful to worship.

  • The currency commonly used in Colonial America was the British pound or Spanish coins called “pieces of eight,”so named because the coins could be cut into smaller denominations of eight pieces.

  • I’m running late this morning. My brain is on overload. Too many and too much “sports” over the weekend. I came home from church and turned on the golf game and watched that to the end, then got into the Olympic games. The sun finally came out, and it was in the 50s at some point in the afternoon. I had a skiff of snow on the ground when I got up this morning. You never know what you’re going to get weather-wise when you live in Kentucky.

  • They were just ordinary everyday folks. Some lived in large cities; others resided in small towns or on isolated farms. Yet, for one brief moment in time they stood in the limelight, and their stories, some delightfully crafted to evoke laughter, others to awaken memories of long ago, became memorialized in newspaper articles, family histories and community narratives.