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Today's Features

  • When I was a kid, my grandmother on my father’s side owned a bakery.

    Whenever we’d visit her we would come home with huge pink bakery boxes filled with assorted butter cookies, plus bags of bagels and loaves of bread and the best cinnamon rolls and bear claws you could ever eat.

    Fun fact: My dad used to say that when Uncle Benny swept the floor at night, whatever he swept up was what he put on the bear claws as toppings.

    I’m pretty sure he was joking, or else he wanted to gross us out so he could eat all the bear claws. 

  • Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church

    Jerry Ellis sang, “Higher Ground” Sunday morning. Happy birthday to Terry Burke! Please pray for Tony Collins, Larry and Phyllis Adkins, Wayne & Ginny Smither, Sue Sipple, our military, police and first responders, our president and leaders, peace in Jerusalem and Korea and our great country.

    Tonight (Wed.) at church from 6 to 6:45, Felecia Collins and family will receive friends to honor her mother, Janet Smoot. The memorial will start at 6:45 p.m. with a balloon release and fellowship meal at 7 p.m.

  • 5 years ago
    June 19, 2013
    Relay Revelry

    Cancer survivors were met with cheers as they made their way around the track at Itron Field Friday during the annual Owen County Relay for Life.

    The yearly event raises money for the American Cancer Society and this year’s Relay committee members say they expect to reach their goal of $49,000 later this year.

  • It is a mystery that has remained unsolved for 230 years. Was it a crime committed by an Indian who acted alone or was it an accident?

    The mysterious death in 1788 of Kentucky’s first historian, John Filson, was the subject of the historical society program last week.

    Jason French, curator of collections at the Beringher-Crawford Museum in Covington, presented several possible scenarios for Filson’s death; leaving final conclusions to his captivated audience.

  • It was another great week for haying. Bruce and Fay got theirs cut, baled and in the barn dry, as did most of the farmers in this area.

    Unfortunately, they had bad luck with the barn itself. Somebody stole the siding off the barn on the Branch.

  • Early pioneers in Kentucky claimed land by “tomahawk rights.”  These rights were acquired by deadening a few trees near a spring and making one’s mark, name or initials in the bark. This practice was also accompanied by cabin and corn claims. As a result of building a cabin or planting a crop of corn upon a section of land, a person was acknowledged as its owner.

  • It’s overcast this morning after a week or so of sunshine. During that week all the farmers around here got their hay cut, dried, raked and baled. That is almost a miracle. It only happens about one year out of every six in this part of Kentucky.
    Wanda said she raked hay for Ray all day Wednesday. She said this was the first time she had attempted this chore, but she got it done while Ray came behind her and baled. They got it all into the barn on Friday. I drove into Owenton late last week, and everybody along the road was doing the same job.  

  • It’s beautiful out this morning. The sun is shining and melting the frost off my front yard. Yes, it’s May, and I still see frost. That’s always the way when you live in a valley — it’s the last place to get frost and the first place to get a freeze in the fall. But I’m not complaining, the sun is shining this morning, and all is well in my small part of the world.

  • The first orphanage in America was established in 1729 when Indians massacred settlers near Natchez, Miss. An orphanage was unusual during this time; most orphans in the 1700s were taken into homes of neighbors or relatives. There was no court or government involvement. Families and friends just took it upon themselves to take these children under their wing to be raised as part of the family.