• I will not discuss the details of the allegations against me (I am not even sure exactly what they were) as the grand jury has made its findings. I do adamantly disagree with the allegations, assertions and attacks on my character and behavior. My responsibility has been and continues to be what’s best for kids – often that means we have to change how we do business – change is hard and it is human nature to resist change because we all become comfortable in how we do things.

  • May 18 is a critical election for Owen County. With the loss of tobacco contracts and tobacco buyout funds ending with the terms of the leaders we elect, the economy and lifestyle of Owen County is changing. The question is, changing to what?

  • Times are tough. Times have always been tough. That’s never changed. For generations we get politicians time and time again telling us how they are going to make things better for us. But when you look at Kentucky’s statistics, it makes you want to pull your hair out. We are bottom of the list in America for education, health care, and wealth.

  • With elections just around the corner, I would like for everyone to think about the significance of every single vote and its impact on the future of our county, state and country. Today, more than ever before, we are pressed to look beyond “party loyalty,” the “good ole boy” system, retaliation, or complacency, when voting. Whether local, state or federal, the consequences are often the same – a bad political landscape with poor policy making.

  • Thursday, May 6, is the National Day of Prayer. Bro. Franklin Graham is asking every Christ follower to assemble somewhere to pray.

    I’ll be at the flagpole at the (Owen County) Courthouse. See you at the pole.

    Dr. Joy Arnold-Morse



  • I have recently become involved in a very unpleasant situation at Owen County schools.

    There have been events in the last two weeks that have hopefully opened the eyes of those in charge and with any luck by the time this letter prints, (Mark Cleveland) will have been removed from his position as superintendent of Owen County schools.

  • Have you ever read the Constitution of the United States? Sure, we all learned about it in school and probably memorized the preamble. You may have a basic understanding of the Bill of Rights and subsequent amendments, but when was the last time you really read the Constitution and gave any thought to its meaning? I would imagine that our children know more about the Constitution than most adults do. We have simply forgotten why it was written and what it represents.

  • Leadership of Owen County was held on April 7 and the topic was health care.

    Our day began at the Owen County Extension office and the first place we went to visit was the New Horizon Specialty Clinic.

  • If you have not seen or heard of the local event that took place April 23, it was a charity event entitled Scream the Cure.  

    This charity concert with hard core bands (metal) raised money for our local chapter of Relay for Life. 

    Bands from Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio came to Owen County free of charge and performed from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. to help raise money for cancer patients all across the U.S. 

  • We had 6,000 students drop out of our schools in 2008 and I have no doubt that ’09 will be just as high.

    The state wonders what to do about our high dropout rate when all they need is to look at their local school boards. Our local boards punish good students and force them to drop out. As a parent of three, I had to fight tooth and nail to get my oldest to school, but I did it. Now, I have one left, my youngest, who really likes school but has a heart condition.

  • To the voters in Owen County District 4.

  • Those of us in the Class of ‘63 are celebrating a significant birthday this year, the one that ends in 5. We represent the last whimper of the war babies, conceived with rationed gas and sugar stamps or on a desperate furlough when it seemed the war would never end.

    Next year the first line of Baby Boomers descend on Medicare, and the whole world will pause to pontificate. The cover of Time magazine will announce the beginning of a new era, “60 Minutes” will reflect, and the Internet will explode with stories from the sublime to the ridiculous.

  • I’ve written a lot of columns and editorials in my time but this is the first time I’ve ever quoted Otto von Bismarck, the German politician from the 19th century.

    “Politics is the art of the possible,” Bismarck once said.

    The 2010 Kentucky General Assembly ended its regular session last week without doing the single-most important thing it is supposed to accomplish – get a state budget passed.

    Now, the legislators will be called back into session later this summer to pass a compromise bill.

  • What is your definition of perfect?

    This past weekend was perfect as far as the weather goes. Who could not get used to days like that? But what makes something perfect? Sometimes perfection can be arbitrary. What might be perfect to me might not be perfect to you.

    Last Tuesday night in the Alamo Dome in San Antonio a basketball team did something that was perfectly perfect, again.

  • There are certain dates that are ingrained in your memories. These certain dates will always remind you of something. Whether it’s a birthday, anniversary or the day of a historically important date, there are just certain dates on the calendar that stand out.

    April 15th is one of those days.

    Tax Day.

    Paying taxes feels like walking up to Count Dracula, offering up your neck and saying, “Try to take it easy this time, pal.”

  • Former U.S. Speaker of the House of Representatives Tip O’Neill was the kind of Democrat that gives Democrats a good name.

    He was strong-willed, a bit gruff and totally committed to the people who sent him to office year after year.

    Although he was in charge of the House during the Reagan administration and often served as counterbalance to his conservative president’s agenda, there is one sentence, one singular idea, that will probably long outlive O’Neill’s legislative record.

  • I hope by now most of you have received your 2010 Census form and have taken the opprotunity to complete the form and put it in the mail. April 1 has been officially declared Census Day in the United States. On that day you can come to the courthouse to the Judge-executive office to complete your form (between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.) or the Owen County Library (between 9 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.) for assistance.

  • Every year about this time, I come down with a case of March Madness. You see, I absolutely love the University of Kentucky men’s basketball team. If my Wildcats get knocked out of the running early for the championship, the salt goes out of living. If they do well in tournament play, euphoria lifts my flat feet until I fancy I could dance on rooftops.

  • As we enter the closing weeks of the 2010 Regular Session, the Senate passed legislation that will improve job opportunities for career and technical students, regulate methadone treatment centers, and crack down on meth traffickers. We also continued our work on the state budget, and I continued my work on more transparency in campaign finance reporting.

    The Senate passed House Bill 288, another piece of campaign finance reform legislation that I was able to improve through my role as chairman of the Senate State and Local Government Committee.

  • On Saturday, the Owenton Manor Rehab and Nursing will be hosting an annual community Easter bash. We hope to have several thousand eggs to hide and lots of prizes. We would like to invite you to take part in the event. We are in need of candy and items to put into the eggs. If you or your business would like to be a part of this event, please contact Teresa Perry at Owenton Manor. We will be announcing all sponsors throughout the day and they will be listed on the calendar of events.