• Lately I’ve been fascinated by stories of people who grew up in church and now have abandoned the denominations of their youth, and sometimes church altogether.

    In a very funny memoir, “Mennonite in a Little Black Dress,” Rhoda Janzen writes about having to wear frumpy skirts, granny panties and doilies on her head and eating lots of potatoes.

  • As I was on my knees one Saturday afternoon, I had an epiphany.

    Lest you think I was on my knees praying, I wasn’t, although Lord knows I should have been. And it wasn’t so much an epiphany as it was a random thought.

  • In the next few weeks, the candidates for several different offices in Owen County will hit the streets and try to convince their neighbors that they are the best person for the job.

  • In light of recent events, I felt compelled to personally and publically thank Mr. Tim Marcum for his continuing service to Owen County schools, Owen County athletics and Owen County students.

  • The other day, I was throwing together a hash-brown potato casserole at the last minute for a potluck family reunion when I realized the recipe called for a can of Campbell’s Cream of Mushroom soup, an item I’d forgotten to pick up on my run to the grocery store. But not to worry, I thought.

  • In 2006, we were told by doctors in another hospital that our mother would die in the next few days.

    The reason I am sharing these thoughts with you is I was approached by someone who wanted more information on the home dialysis and I feel there are more people out there who one day may need to think about going this way instead of going to a clinic and going through a more aggressive treatment.

    Instead of doing it daily, you do it every two to three days and it is more aggressive.

  • Thank you, Owen County.

    I was overwhelmed with gratitude for the Rotary Club’s “Owen Countian of the Year” award, presented to me at the Owen County Fair 2010. I was so surprised.

    I was about age 42 when I felt the urge to record Owen County’s local history. My dreams, aspirations and desire of yester years began to unfold into action.

  • 1 John 5:2 says, “This is how we know that we love the children of God: by loving God and carrying out his commands.” 

    Notice the word of God tells us to first of all love God and also carry out his commands. During the summer months of 2010, the Baptist churches in Owen County surely showed their love for God and his children; and by doing this they also followed his commands. Almost 100 percent of the Baptist churches collected school supplies for the Owen County Schools.

  • My name is Patty Barnes and I have been on dialysis for almost a year.

    Three times a week I travel to northern Kentucky to receive dialysis treatment. I also see Dr. Mital, a kidney specialist in northern Kentucky.

    If the dialysis clinic had opened here in Owenton, I could see him more, instead of traveling.

  • I’d like to take a moment to say thank you to those who have been taking the time and energy to pick up trash along the roads in Owen County. I’ve seen them a few times on my way to Frankfort and I saw a group working on the Sparta Road the other day. It surely does make a difference when people care enough to keep our county clean.

    It would be wonderful if people wouldn’t throw the trash out in the first place, but thank goodness there are those willing to pick it up. Your efforts are appreciated. If I were able, I would help you myself.

  • For 37 years, I have made Owen County my home. It is a home by choice, having decided all those years ago to leave the home of my childhood and the home of my young adult life. From New York to Owen County – followed by many instances of having to address the question posed by all of my family and each of my friends in the North, “Why Kentucky?” And from my new-found friends and neighbors in Kentucky the question, “Why here, why Owen County?”

  • “Everyone has a story to tell, and everyone can learn from the stories of others. These stories, taken together, are the stories of our communities, our counties, our regions, and unique Kentucky culture and heritage.”

    – The Kentucky Humanities Council

  • A wise man once uttered four words that have changed my life. While talking to him about his life and the successes he had enjoyed, he offered me some marital advice that I try and live by. Notice I said “try.” He said, Brian, if you want to find happiness then you need to remember this phrase: “Happy wife, happy life.”eeBefore I go any further let me just say, I love you, honey. eeSaturday night was my 20-year class reunion from Campbell County High School.

  • Edith Rose Stewart was born on Dec. 14, 1923. She was raised on a farm on Stewart’s Ridge Road in Owen County with her parents and nine siblings.

  • I would like to commend the Owen County Board of Education in its choice for interim superintendent for Owen County Schools.

    In the course of my tenure at Grant County Schools, Mr. Don Martin was an exceptional superintendent for that school district.

  • When I was a young boy, one of my most treasured possessions was my stuffed frog.

    I remember stalking around the Harrison County Fair – probably sometime around 1971 or 1972 – with my older sister, looking atone of those games where you toss a dart at a balloon and the tag behind it tells you what you won.

    It was always my favorite game at the county fair. Boys seem to have an innate love of things that go “POP.”

  • I’ve always had a bit of a jaded attitude toward the world we live in.

    My parents, both part of the baby boom era, were older than the parents of the other kids in school. Both grew up on farms where work was something you did if you wanted to keep food on the table and clothes on your back.

    From the stories they’ve told all my life, neighbors were an integral part of day-to-day life. You shared what you had with your neighbor, though it may not be much, and you helped each other in whatever way you could.

  • For those who say nothing ever happens in Owen County ... I almost knocked down William Shatner at Elk Creek Winery a few weeks ago.

    I was there to have lunch with Benjy Hamm, editorial director for Landmark Community Newspapers, the parent company of the News-Herald.

    We discussed business and, as always, had a great meal at the winery.

    After lunch, we walked around and visited the store.

  • Today we no longer express our feelings, thoughts, or do daily work at our place of employment on the written page.

    We now tend to communicate in new ways. We have been swallowed up by technology. We e-mail, copy on disc, text abbreviated messages, or talk on the cell phones. In these paperless times, writing letters, lists, or paper work is nearly a lost art.

    In some circumstances, however, things written down can be more effectively used. I found this to be especially true involving the delinquent tax list for 2009.

  • It seems to me that bad fathers, from King Lear to Angela’s Ashes, get more coverage in literature than good ones. From a lifetime of reading, I finally pulled up Atticus Finch from To Kill a Mockingbird as an example of a great literary dad. Perhaps the villains outnumber the nice guys in fiction because they drive a plot more easily than steady men. Or perhaps it is true, as the Bible warns us, that the sins of the fathers are visited on the children even unto the third and fourth generation.