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Opinion

  • Thanksgiving is full of traditions. There is turkey, dressing, football, uncles asleep in recliners, indigestion, and oh yeah, pumpkin pie.

     I have also begun another Thanksgiving tradition. In case you have not caught on, this is now my third installment of the Golden Gobble Awards celebrating the biggest turkeys in sports for the past year. Well, not exactly celebrating but rather ridiculing and maybe even making fun of.

    The Golden Gobble for Team That Resembles an NFL Franchise goes to the Cincinnati Bengals.

  • It’s Margaret A. (Kasner) Murphy again.

    My thanks and appreciation to the Kentucky American Water Pumping Station II at “Hardin’s Landing” for our invitation to share in this very special celebration. More water to the people.

    Lela M. Karsner Hawkins, 93, Margaret A. (Karsner) Murphy, 91, and Christina Rice all are included with the Hardin cousins.

    Thanks to our friend Bro. David Wotier for remembering us on this day.

  • On Nov. 11, 2010 I had the privilege to address the students at Owen County High School about the importance of Veterans Day. Also in attendance were several Veterans and family members as well as many Owen County faculty and staff. Before the assembly, the Veterans and their family members were treated to a very delicious meal and a tour of the facility if they so desired.

  • Have you noticed how Black Friday is becoming a bigger deal each year?

    Back 10 or 12 years ago when big retailers started opening up before the break of dawn to offer special deals the day after Thanksgiving, it wasn’t really that big of a deal. I had no interest in going out in what I would call the middle of the night to go shopping, and I had a hard time imagining who would.

    Part of the job for any good reporter is going out and finding out what other people think, and I had my eyes opened on my first Black Friday in Corbin.

  • I wanted to publicly say thank you to Ms. Wallace and her staff for honoring the veterans this past week in such a memorable and touching way.

    Since serving in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War in the 1950s, this is the first time someone has said, “Thank you for your service to this country.”

  • There is an enormous hole in the roadside on the south side of Sawridge Creek Road across from the Monterey Firehouse and the soccer fields and the Artifacts store.

    It’s been there a while. When things get busy, which is not too often but not rare either, people and horses fall into the hole.

    So far, no one has died or been permanently injured by the fall as far as I know (I’m not sure about the horse), but it will happen again if the problem isn’t fixed.

  • I was 16 years old when Carl Johnson died on this ribbon of a road that winds between the river and a limestone cliff. He was not much older. We never spoke a word to each other. At least, I have no memory of his voice. But his black eyes looked out on the world through long, angel lashes and all the girls agreed that he was beautiful. If you favored delicate-boned, olive skinned boys, that is, which I didn’t, preferring taller, sturdier types.

  • In a few weeks, Owen County families, some of whom have traveled many miles to return home, will gather to celebrate Thanksgiving.

    Most dinners will feature “Mr. Turkey,” complemented by potatoes and gravy, vegetables, rolls, and a variety of pies served in the good old-fashioned Owen County way.

  • I will be so glad when this election is over. I am sick and tired of all the political ads — on both sides. I mute them or watch DirecTV now to get away from them. Neither party of any of the races have shown themselves adult enough to be a representative of this state or any other elected position, which doesn’t mean to say I won’t vote. I have voted in every election since I got the privilege at 18. If you don’t vote, you have no right to complain.

  • The Civil War tore at the very fiber of America. And though the state of Kentucky initially declared neutral, it soon found itself embroiled in the battle, with loyalties dividing families, friends, and neighbors.

  • I would like to tell you about my experience with the Owen County Adult Learning Center and its staff.

    First, let me start off by saying that I dropped out of high school back in 1995. Needless to say, when I came into the center this past February, I was nowhere near prepared to take the GED test.

    I took the pre-test, had it explained to me where I placed, what actions to take next, and to come back on Tuesday to start classes.

  •  I am writing to voice my support for Neese Chilton who is running for Owen County School Board for district five. I have had the honor and pleasure of knowing Neese and her family personally for five years since she has trusted me to watch her son during the day time (I have known Neese for much longer but the past five years I have gotten close to her and her family).  Neese is from Owen County and lives in the Wheatley area.

  • Ms. Mason, it sounds to me as though you have judged all Christians. Maybe you talked to or heard five or 10 saying something. I believe there are thousands of Christians that don’t say such things.

    I am a sinner saved by Grace. I’m not a model Christian or a Bible scholar, but Jesus said, “Judge not that ye be not judged” Matthew 7:1-2.

    Did you open the door. We are to separate ourselves from such.

  • I hope that four to five years from now, we’re on our way to a strong recovery, based on the fact that a record number of voters embraced their rights and made an informed decision at the voting booth in 2010.  

    There couldn’t be a more important election than this one.

    The corporate power behind many of the candidates is not out of generosity, but out of greed and the need for control. 

  • To the voters in district four:

    Troy Bramblett is running against Ray Smith for Owen County fourth-district magistrate in the Nov. 2 General Election. 

    Our district includes the areas of Wheatley, Monterey, Gratz, Pleasant Home and Perry Park.  There is a crucial need to have new blood to represent our district.

    On Thursday night, Oct. 14, a district-four forum was held at the Monterey Fire House for the purpose of meeting and asking questions to the incumbent Ray Smith and Troy Bramblett.   

  • John Waltz in campaign literature claims that Congressman Geoff Davis “refused to help him get treatment he needed from the VA.” When an experimental anthrax vaccine caused Waltz health problems.

    There is no record to tell us what Congressman Geoff Davis did, or did not do for Waltz, just the claim to by Waltz, who is running for congress against Geoff Davis.

  •  She claimed she was not a historian but a memoirist; yet the words of Georgia Green Stamper, guest speaker at the Owen County Historical Society meeting Thursday, skillfully took on the cadence of the color, life, and movement of Owen County history.

  • I have noticed in the News-Herald that many animals in several counties in Kentucky are being mistreated. Many dogs and puppies are being abandoned in our area. The Owen County Friends of Animals Inc. — (502) 514-1439 — has several dogs for adoption. They do a wonderful job taking care of homeless dogs, but financial help is needed. Please help “Man’s Best Friend.”

    The following by an unknown author was found on the Internet:

    A Dog’s Plea

  • Annelise wants to be a spaceman, she told me, so that she and I can fly to the moon.

    “What will we do when we get there?” I asked, not telling her that the astronauts had found the moon to be a cold, dark place.  I sank deeper into my easy chair, though, in case she had any ill-timed illusions of leaving the earth’s atmosphere that afternoon. My bones have been achy lately, and I wasn’t sure I was up to spur of the moment space travel.

  • At the beginning of time — so the stories went — my people decided to leave the faraway land of Virginia, and made a great pilgrimage across the mountains, and through the gap, seeking our “Promised Land.” It was the singular most extraordinary event in our history. Our people became legends, our stories myths, our places hallowed.

    With these words, columnist and Kentucky author Georgia Green Stamper, who will be the special guest of the historical society Thursday evening, describes her forefathers’ journey from Virginia to Owen County, Kentucky.