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Opinion

  • One of my mentors-at-a-distance was Carl Sagan. I watched his now-famous TV show, Cosmos, read some of his books and read his articles in the popular media. His words in a Sunday magazine article, though written over 20 years ago, blazed off the paper and have stuck with me through the years. Carl saw the training he received as a great gift, one that the son of an immigrant would never have received except for this wonderful confluence of time and space – here and now and in America.

  • When I was younger, it was always a treat for me to get to come to Owenton.

    It may not be the biggest city, it may not have big fancy restaurants, a Wal-Mart or a plethora of clothing stores, but there was always something about Owenton that appealed to me.

    As I’ve gotten older, I’ve noticed something about Owenton that is drastically different from other cities I’ve visited. The courthouse sits at the center of downtown, and the downtown area thrives right around the courthouse.

  • In a society where so much emphasis is being placed on winning, it seems there is not enough being placed on how to act when you do. Not only can you be a poor sport when you lose, it is not uncommon for someone to be a sore winner.

    That is not the case in Owen County.

    The basketball teams made history this season when both the varsity girls and boys won a District Championship. The boys even advanced to the semifinals of the 8th Region Tournament.

  • As most of you probably know, on the morning of Jan. 22 my daughter was in a horrific car accident. She had left, as she did every morning, wondering if I liked her shirt, if her hair looked OK and could I grab her a snack for breakfast. In less than five minutes after she left, a friend of hers called me and said, “Katey has been in an accident.” It took me seconds to be out the door and to her.

  • For the last month I have been living two very different lives. One as a newspaper reporter and the other as a student at Lexington Theological Seminary. I have realized I cannot do both and do them both well.

    It is with a heavy heart that I have decided to leave the staff of the News-Herald. While I am looking forward to this new path in my life, it is sad to see my time as a reporter come to an end.

  • A few thoughts ...

    When a local person is invited to participate in a beauty pageant, it’s usually pretty big news.

    If one of our local ladies was asked to strut her stuff in an important competition, the News-Herald would devote a lot of ink to it – pictures, a nice story, reaction from mom and dad – stuff like that.

    Well, one Owen County resident was recently asked to take their place among dozens of beautiful, smart, ambitious young women.

    But other than this mention, the News-Herald won’t be covering the event.

  • Can there be anything more heart-breaking than having a sick or injured child?

    Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve had two people I know endure that special pain.

    The News-Herald Office Manager, Sherry Lyons, is dealing with her daughter’s accident. Sherry is a very strong woman and seems to be handling things as well as possible.

    Things haven’t been so good for another friend of mine.

    A tumor was recently found on the kidney of a dear friend’s 3-year-old son, Seth.

  • I once took a trip to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan in early March. I was broadcasting basketball on the radio at the time for Northern Kentucky University and the team headed north to play Lake Superior State University.

    The team lost and the next morning on the bus outside the hotel I was listening to a local disc jockey who said with much enthusiasm that the current temperature was -2 degrees. He then went on to say that spring was just around the corner.

    While I appreciated his optimism, I’ve never quite understood it.

  • Boy, last week stunk.

    I’m sure it stunk for thousands of other Owen countians stuck in the dark.

    When I was a kid, I was a big fan of winter – snow storms meant no school; sleigh riding down the steep hill in front of my mom’s house in Cynthiana; snowball fights with the 14 other kids who lived in my neighborhood; or chasing my dog Radar through the snow drifts.

    For a kid, heavy snow is just another opportunity to have fun.

  • I am independent and usually self-sufficient, but the second total hip-replacement surgery in four years and the recent snowstorm left my driveway and my porch inches deep in snow and me unable to clean it.

    First, Brett Inman who was here installing a new bathroom heater, took the time to shovel part of the drive and to clean the snow off the porch. I didn’t ask him to do it.

  • It all started on a very cold day in February at Elk Creek Lodge and ended where it began on a very warm day in October.

    A group of people ranging in age and occupation set out on a journey to learn more about education, health care, child services, government, agriculture, entrepreneurship and industry relating to our community.

    February was the kickoff to it all as we learn things about the people in the group and each other’s view and perceptions of what to expect of the leadership class.

  • Gracious people and our Gracious Lord Jesus were there when our van went over the edge of Highway 22, Dec. 23.

    It was “black ice night.” I made the mistake of tapping my brake, preparing for a curve, past the high school. Sapling trees prevented me from rolling. The seat belt held. The air bag did not even open.

    Mike W. was at my window in less than one minute. “I’ll call 911,” he encouraged after he found I was unharmed.

  • Music has always been an integral part of my life. The amount of money I have invested in my CD and record collection would more than likely seem foolish to most. My collection spans many genres including country, western swing, blues, classical, jazz and so on.

  • Back when I was the editor of a paper in Corbin, I had a pair of religion columnists who submitted the same pre-Christmas article every year.

    These columnists were very devout, very conservative and very traditional in their writing. They often came out and decried the “modern’ world and urged readers to abandon some of the more secular aspects of Christmas.

  • Do we have eminent domain going on here in Owenton? It sure seems like it.

    I encourage all of you to go and look at the old drug store and the building beside it. Plaster is falling off the ceiling. Water has stood in the floor. In the old drug store, the ceiling fan is bent down from where it has leaked. Hardly any of the windows are left in the building.

    I encourage you to go and look behind these buildings. You might be surprised to see what is back there. There are broken steps, wires are everywhere and the backdoor is open for kids to go in.

  • After reading the letter to the editor titled “Mother Says Wine and Kids Don’t Mix” in last week’s paper, initially I decided there is no point in responding.

    However, after further consideration as director/founder/president of OCFA, the entity that hosted “Fido Fiesta” and the representative that invited minors to assist, I believe it is my responsibility to respectfully respond to Ms. Morris. 

  • I know most kids can’t wait to “grow up.”

    But I never knew how much I would miss my own kid’s childhood until this year.

    My daughter, Elizabeth, turned 13 in late November. This is her first Christmas as a teen.

    It’s a lot harder for me than it is for her.

    For 12 years now, I searched the toy aisles for something I thought she would love. The wish list or letter to Santa was an annual ritual.

    But not these days.

  • While reading the Courier-Journal online several weeks ago, I found an interesting article that hit close to home. The headline read “Kentucky’s small tobacco farms are fading away.”

    I read the article over several times and learned that there are only an estimated 6,000 tobacco farms in Kentucky as of 2007. While in 1997, there were 46,850.

  • Where do a angels come from?

    I’m not talking about the heavenly host or female detectives from a cheesy ’70s TV show.

    The angels in question are the ones who look out for the less fortunate in our community.

    Angels don’t need the spotlight and don’t seek recognition for their good deeds.

    An angel is content to touch the lives of people in need and ease their pain through simple gestures of caring and concern.

    Are you an angel?

    I, for one, am certainly not but from time to time, I try.

  • This letter comes to you in outrage and the very deepest disappointment.

    My mother, Paula Nye, passed away three years ago. She loved birds and had several birdfeeders strategically placed around her house so she could view them from every window of the room in which she lived out her illness.