• I am so tired of seeing dogs run loose in Monterey and nothing being done about it. I hate to bring it up because it just causes negative attention to the town and causes hard feelings with neighbors/friends, but what’s fair is fair.

    When residents like me have had fence put in to abide by the rules, and then we have to sit and watch dogs run loose, it is just not right.

  • The Owen County Art Council would like to thank everyone who made the first annual Sweet Owen Arts in the Park possible. There were many hands behind the scenes that combined to create a great event for Owen County.

  • Maybe you won’t understand this little story if you’ve never felt different, if you’ve always fit in, if you’ve never felt too fat or too thin, too short or too tall ee" if you’ve never been a teenager or can’t remember being one.

    And maybe you can’t laugh at this silliness if you’ve walked a road so harshly different it rises up to taunt you every morning of your life. I think of those who’ve struggled with racial prejudice or serious physical or mental disabilities.

  • On June 11, 1949, Hank Williams Sr. made his first appearance on Nashville’s Grand Ole Opry. He received an unprecedented six encores and was launched into superstardom at 25.

    He was dead by the age of 29.

    On Sept. 9, 1956, Elvis Presley made his first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show. His swiveling hips, snarling lip and southern charm turned him into an overnight superstar.

    He died in 1977 at the age of 42.

    On Feb. 9, 1964, The Beatles made their first appearance on the Sullivan show.

  • A few weeks ago I heard a sermon about wisdom.

    I wisely took notes, then lost them and forgot much of what the pastor said.

    But I do remember one thing. He said God came to King Solomon in a dream and said he could ask for anything and he’d give it to him.

    What’s the one thing you want most, Sol? Riches? Power? A BMW and a penthouse overlooking the city? Good health? Long life? A soft-serve ice cream machine out by the pool?

    Solomon acknowledged God’s great kindness to his father, King David, and now to him as king of Israel.

  • June 13 is a very special day in the history of African-Americans. It was situated in a week that was set aside to recognize that our community is no longer segregated, but unified in an attempt to become viable members of society and to recognize the accomplishments of local communities.

    It was befitting on this special day that the First Annual Two Mile Road Reunion was held on the Gayle and Branom properties.

  • REACH of Northern Kentucky is a Christ-centered nonprofit organization whose goals are to reduce substance abuse among youth and adults and to raise community awareness to the monumental problem of drugs we are facing.

  • What does the clip clop of a horse-drawn carriage, raspberry-lemon scones, Benedictine On Rye, an 1800s girl’s finishing school, a riverboat pilot, historical museum and a civil war soldier have to do with a world cup gun shoot? For goodness sakes.

    It all happened in Owenton Friday, thanks to the generosity and hard work of a number of people and community groups.

  • “Here in Kentucky … [the] past has always felt close and I’ve always felt connected to it, sprung from it, like it or not. Down the road from my house is an old family graveyard. One of the graves there is for a woman whose first name was America. Even though I live in the middle of nowhere, sometimes it feels like I live in the center of it all.”

    Poet Maurice Manning, Southeast Review, 2008


  • I would like to applaud the Owen County Arts Council for the wonderful “Arts in the Park” fair last Saturday. It was evident that a lot of planning and hard work made the event a success.

    It was an impressive mix of excellent exhibitions, talented musicians, accomplished artists, and skilled craftsmen.

    Thanks guys for making this happen.

    Debra Gash

    Owen County

  • This July 4 will find people from all over Kentucky converging on the steps of the capitol building in Frankfort. A great many of these folks will be coming on buses from such cities as Elizabethtown, Louisville, Somerset and many others. This will be the second “tea party” conducted this year at the capitol building. The first one was held on April 15.

  • Alright, I will admit it.

    I was wrong.

    A few weeks ago, I wrote a column decrying the uselessness of Twitter, the Internet service that allows people to send short blasts of information to a list of people who sign up to receive them. In most cases, these 140-character blasts are used to carry irrelevant tidbits like “home from work now. going to take a nap” or “wearing my new sneakers and they are GREAT.”

  • Owen County may not share the doom and gloom stories that we hear from some areas of our county and really worldwide.

    We should be very thankful here in Owen County with the many projects that are under way or have been recently completed.

  • Letter to the Editor:

    I am writing this letter because I am proud of my son, Seth Edmonson, and also our school system. In March I was called to attend a meeting with some of the school staff.

  • Letter to the Editor

    On May 16, we had the privilege to help in our county by picking up trash on Greenup Road. We had several of our youth help in the clean-up. They worked very hard and vowed not to ever throw trash out of their cars. It was quite a learning experience for each person who helped. Some questions that were asked were, “Where does all this trash come from?” and “Why do people throw trash out on the side of the road?” It is sad to say, but most of the trash is thrown out by people who do not realize the impact it has on our county.

  • Letter to the Editor

    You know, sometimes, I’m not proud to live in Monterey.

    When I moved to Monterey, almost 13 years ago, it was the greatest place in the world. People were so nice, yards were kept up, and it was a great place for a family.

    But now, there’s nobody willing to help us uphold the law. Not even people paid to do the job. We have dogs running this town.

    Now I know it could be worse, but I pulled in town last week and before I got home, (I have to drive on two streets before my own) there were four dogs running loose.

  • After 43 years of experience in printing and marketing I have no problems spotting a marketing scare tactic when it appears. On May 29, I received a mailer from the Kentucky Equine Education Project stating that the horse industry was struggling and therefore is leaving the state of Kentucky. I ask you, fellow Kentuckians: Who isn’t struggling in these artificially created hard times? This slick promotional piece concluded that the remedy to this problem was to allow slot gambling at the race tracks.

  • In the twilight years of my life, I have discovered the competitive sport of truck pullin’.

    My son and grandson bought a pulling truck, and they have spent hours working on it, getting it ready to pull. Their first pull was in Cloverdale, Ind., and when they went, I packed my bag and headed for Indiana. I have been to two pulls now, found the fans to be enthusiastic, courteous and of all ages. I was pleased to find out how many Owen countians were involved with this sport, and how good they were.

  • Late last month, Gov. Steve Beshear announced he will call the General Assembly back into session to tackle what is one of the most underappreciated stories in several years.

    While George Bush and Barack Obama were handing out billions and billions of dollars in bank bailouts and economic stimulus packages, somewhere along the way we apparently lost track of exactly how much money we are talking about.

    Kentucky is facing a nearly $1 billion shortfall for the next fiscal year.

    It’s almost an unfathomable amount of money.

  • Today, as we begin to look toward the year 2010 and the May Primary Election, it is clear we must continue to improve the management of voter registrations. The State Board of Elections has reported that they have mailed 441,000 voter postcards in the state of Kentucky, and 142,000 were returned as undeliverable. In most situations, the correct address of the voter is not available. These postcards have been returned to the State Board of Elections and the board, in return has mailed the cards to the County Clerk’s Office in the county where the voter was last registered.