• I love the story of Cletus Eugene, the missing kangaroo an Owen County woman uses as a service animal.

    I’ve covered a lot of stories in my career – some heart-warming and some fairly disgusting – but this story of a missing kangaroo is special.

    Journalistic ethics aside, I want to find this misplaced marsupial.

  • During the past week, I received several comments concerning the article I wrote on the school board’s decision to increase the tax rate. I would like to take this opportunity to address the subject in my own opinion.

    It’s no secret that the United States is currently in a recession. All across the country, men and women are losing their jobs, losing their homes, and can’t afford to pay their bills.

    It’s also no secret people do not like to see tax rates being raised in any situation.

  • ]“A teacher affects eternity,” Henry Adams wrote, words so self-evident they are cliché, words so true they have become part of our folk wisdom. When that happens, nobody hears them anymore, nobody much believes in them anymore.

  • An Aug. 5 Opinion letter from Chris LeSuer petitioned KACo (Kentucky Association of Counties) to provide an explanation for their representation of an Owen County official (to the tune of $51,000) accused of crimes against the taxpayers.

    LeSuer referenced a July 1 article in the Lexington Herald which verified that KACo (a taxpayer-funded organization) routinely offers this type of representation.

    The media exposure of KACo’s questionable practice of utilizing tax dollars in this manner has provoked some dissatisfaction in the community.

  • Fire has always been a destructive force in people’s lives. The Bible associates fire with God’s judgment on wickedness and unbelief, and He is represented as a “consuming fire” when His wrath is revealed.

  • Hypocrisy? 

    Last week was an interesting week in sports. It was also one that made me think about whether certain things that happen are not somewhat hypocritical.  

    Two big sports stories hit during the week and both were full of controversy and raised many an eyebrow. 

    The first came when it was reported that Louisville head coach Rick Pitino admitted to police that six years ago he had an affair with a woman in Louisville.

  • Last Thursday, the Senior Citizens Center echoed with the memories of childhood as author Charlotte Ann Kemper Atchison entertained the crowd with stories of growing up in Owen County. People broke out in laughter as Charlotte described how, as a curious little girl, she wondered what would happen if she quickly shut the screen door on her cat’s tail. Would the tail bounce like a bowl of jelly or break in two? Much to her dismay, when the cat yowled in pain, Charlotte’s momma administered a bit of pain to Charlotte’s own tail.

  • The Owen County Bus Transportation Department would like to express our gratitude and appreciation to the New Horizons clinic workers who made our physicals go smoothly and timely.

    The new facility is really something special for Owen County. It was spacious and well staffed. Their friendly atmosphere and pleasantness meant a lot to all of us.

  • I would just like to commend the staff at New Horizons Medical Center for the excellent care I received while a patient at our hospital.

    Having been a nurse myself for over 20 years, I am not used to being the patient but I must say, I was impressed with New Horizons. We are so fortunate to have this facility in our community and more people should take advantage of it and support it.

    So to everyone at New Horizons, keep up the good work you are doing to improve the health and well being of our citizens.

    Tammy McDonald


  • Another successful year at the fair. The reason: So many people giving of their time and effort. Lots of people don’t realize that so many of these people take their vacation time to have a successful fair for the people of Owen County and a lot of children that can’t go somewhere else for fun.

    And a special thanks for the memorial to Charles Wright. A special thanks to all that remembered him in every event. He was not there in body but I am sure he was there in spirit.

    Betty Wright

  • Most of us remember the rhymes and doggerels of our childhood and growing up in Owen County brings memories of the games played with  friends long ago. We played jump rope, hopscotch, kick the can, and marbles. Counting out rhymes like “one potato, two potato” designated which child would be “it” in a game of tag or hide-and-seek.

  • Editor’s Note: Georgia Green Stamper is on vacation. This column first appeared in August 2008.

    In August of 1956, Daddy observed that his tobacco crop needed another couple of weeks to yellow in the fields before cutting. If my mother and I wanted, he allowed as how he could slip away from the farm work for a few days, and we could join his sisters and their families on a short vacation trip to the Smokey Mountains.

  • There is a service that Owen County provides to its citizens that I suspect is not generally well known. The service is one whereby the county will provide transportation, to and from medical appointments, for its citizens, mostly – though not limited to – its senior citizens.

  • The creek was over my bridge again last week. This time we had three inches of rain in about two hours and it was about 23 inches above the floor of the bridge. The bridge held again but it needs a bit of help this time. As soon as John gets through with his painting, I’ll get him down here to do some minor repairs on it.

  • I consider myself a well-informed citizen. I read local papers, watch the news on TV and visit news-related sites on the Internet regularly. When I heard about allegations and fraud abuse at the Kentucky Association of Counties (KACo) recently, I paid little attention. “This doesn’t affect my family or my community,” I thought. I was wrong.

  • The upcoming fall and winter months may be particularly difficult for rural communities (as well as urban) across the nation. The persistence of an economic recession, combined with a potentially devastating flu season sets the stage for a time of unprecedented need. I strongly encourage communities nationwide to unite within their community and develop a cooperative strategy of survival in times of disaster. Take note of those in your community with special needs, such as the elderly, disabled and fatherless homes.

  • Writing is a solitary avocation. I’m reminded of the wonderful old movie where Jimmy Stewart rambles on and on to an invisible giant white rabbit named Harvey. Writing is like that – a one-sided conversation, with the author doing all the talking, while the reader, as invisible as Harvey, may or may not be listening or even be in the same room.

  • I would like to ask other Owen countians to join me in offering a word of praise and thanks to a remarkable group of youth and their leaders. I regret that I do not have a list of all their names.

  • I just finished reading the story in this week’s paper about the magistrates rejecting the plan to spend $5,000 to clean the second floor of the old jail building but voted to spend the money to temporarily move the Sheriff’s office and rent another building for $1,000 a month.

    The building will still need to be cleaned and repaired to keep birds from getting in, so that money will still need to be spent, plus it will cost money for the move both ways not to mention the cost to set up the new building for the everyday business of the sheriff’s office.

  • This letter is to express thanks to the staff of New Horizon Medical Center in Owenton and to a few other “Angels of Mercy” who helped me through a life-threatening situation. Last week, I was on a scheduled medical visit when the staff of New Horizon Medical Center discovered that, among a few other symptoms, I had lost a significant amount of blood. Not wanting to risk the time needed for an ambulance to take me to another hospital, they called for a helicopter to have me flown to St. Elizabeth in Florence.