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Opinion

  • And 2009 started off so promisingly ...

    The past 12 months have not been such a good stretch for the United States.

    We did have an historic inauguration in January 2009 but its been pretty downhill since then.

    The summer brought us discontent as the two sides in the health-care debate fought tooth and nail to have their voices and concerns heard.

    The economy sputtered along. Although the numbers later in the year started getting stronger, I don’t think anyone is ready or willing to say there will be a vast improvement in 2010.

  • As you may know by now, for the past three years the staff of the Owen County Clerk’s office has been working hard learning new technology. With this new technology and our commitment to serve we are looking forward to 2010.

    Election Day is coming in 2010. With my prediction of a record number of voters expected to arrive at the polls, the clerk’s office is working to make sure you have a smooth voting experience.

  • Bing Crosby may have dreamed of snow, but my Christmases in the Bluegrass have been mostly muddy, and have been better for it, in my opinion. I have, however, been stuck in a blizzard with a blind date on New Year’s Eve. Because of that singular experience New Year’s is painted forever white in my memory.

  • I guess I am drawn to stories about angels. I can’t let the Christmas season pass without the mention of all the angels we have as friends and neighbors in Owen County.

    You see every year the community angel tree is started around Thanksgiving. This year was no different. Nicole here at the office wanted to, “Put the tree up,” and me saying, “It’s too early.” We did prepare our spot in the office and decorated our tree and waited for the girls at the extension office to bring our angels to hang on it.

  • In the song “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” the composer laments that although he knows it’s a long road back, he promises to be home for Christmas. Reminiscing about the memories of home, he ends with the line: if only in my dreams.

     Whether near or far, whether returning home for Christmas or not, Owen countians cherish their memories of that special time of year by sharing traditions with their families, thus preserving their history and heritage.

  • It was fun last week to read the letters listing what kids all over Owenton wanted for Christmas. The great thing about kids is that they don’t understand what things cost or how impractical they might be. Instead they just ask for the things they want and hope for the best.

    As a sports fan, I have decided to do the same thing. I have put together my wish list for things I would like to see during the next year. Call it my Christmas Wish List for the Sports Fan.

  • There is a saying: “The best laid plans of mice and men often go awry.” It was based on an ode that Scottish poet Robert Burns wrote when he turned over a newly built mouse nest as he plowed his fields. Seeing the mouse scamper away with no hope of rebuilding that nest because the season was so late, Burns reflected on how many times, although carefully thought out, plans don’t always turn out the way we envisioned them.

  • My first Christmas season here at The News-Herald brought with it a lot of responsibility. I found out that it would be my duty to type hundreds of letters from Owen County children, each addressed to the big guy at the North Pole – Santa Claus.

  • The fine, elegant hands glided effortlessly across the piano keys as music filled the church and embedded itself in my soul. The straight back of Margaret Alice Murphy never once lost its composure as I watched in amazement this almost 91-year-old Owen County historian and genealogist play straight through 17 songs, several of which were difficult to perform.

  • The Christmas season formally got under way this week in Owenton.

    The annual Christmas parade was held Sunday and Santa Claus made several appearances across the community. It must be tough to pull himself away from the North Pole at this time of year, but that’s the kind of guy he is – anything for the kids.

    But times are tough in the commonwealth these days and we should all think about how we can help each other.

  • Muhammad Ali once boasted, “I am the greatest.”

    Was he really? What makes someone the greatest?

    Over the years, sports fans have had the chance to debate who is the greatest at a particular sport? For example, who is better Michael Jordan or Oscar Robertson? Who was the better baseball player, Pete Rose or Ty Cobb? Jack Nickalus or Tiger Woods?

    Each comparison might spark a passionate debate among friends.

  • I haven’t set out to win the Nobel Peace Prize, mind you. (Although if it’s thrust upon me, I will follow President Obama’s example and accept the honor with humility.) But it’s come to my attention that Kraft Foods has ignited a brouhaha by discontinuing production of its processed garlic cheese roll, the key ingredient in the classic recipe for cheese grits casserole otherwise known as “World Peace Grits.” Thus, I throw myself into the breach to do whatever I can. 

  • Celebrate.

    Remember.

    Fight back.

    This is the motto of Relay for Life and has become my motto in the past several years.

    At this time of year, I find myself still concerned about “the fight.”

    I think this happens because of “remembering” my grandparents – Raymond and Kathleen Duncan. I miss them terribly around the holidays and I know I’m not alone in that. Anyone who has ever lost a loved one knows that grief doesn’t take holidays.

  • Don’t Owen countians pay enough taxes?

    In response to Bonnie Strassell’s letter to the editor from Nov. 4, I wanted to present my side of the argument concerning the library tax.

    Although my family and I do not use the library as much as we’d like, I agree that it’s a vital and necessary part of the community.

    I appreciate the work the library staff does and know that the services they provide are important to many citizens in our county. I’m also aware that the resources and programs the library offers are not free.

  • Omar Carr walked out of the Old Testament, down the aisle of the New Columbus Methodist Church, and laid the fruits of his labor on God’s altar. Of course, he didn’t wear flowing robes like Abraham and Elijah and the others I’d seen in pictures. He favored denim overalls, and his thick reddish-brown hair was held in place with a weathered felt-brimmed hat, but he had the look of a patriarch none the less. And even a child could tell that Omar’s offering was what Cain should have been about instead of goofing off and picking fights with his brother Abel.

  • As a resident of East Perry Street, I want to thank (Owenton Police Chief) Terry Gentry and his crew, Mayor (Wotier) and the city council for working on cleaning this street up – the speeding on a dead-end street, the drugs, the viscious dogs, and run-down property. It had gotten so bad everything you own had to be padlocked, even the gates on my yard fence. This is the first time in my life I have had to do this.

    The people who don’t see the problem must be the problem, because 90 percent of the residents on the street “see the problem.”

  • I understand that it is the media’s job to inform the public of news, crime, and entertainment. After reading last week’s paper about the East Perry “problems,” it struck me and other residents on this street as an offensive and degrading statement.

    The article had nothing constructive for the street and set a even more negative tone for it.

    East Perry is a community full of youth and diversity. What separates East Perry from any other street in this town?

    Nothing.

  • I am writing this in regards to the OCHS Veterans Day Luncheon.

    It was a wonderful lunch and the meal was quite good.

    The ceremony for the veterans was beautiful, but what impressed me most was how well-behaved the students were. Owen County should be proud of their young people. They were very respectful and courteous to all the veterans and their families.

    They made me proud to be from Owenton and glad my grandchildren will someday attend that school in the future.

    I thank the staff and students for a wonderful afternoon of honoring our veterans

  • There are three things that are constant for the middle of November:

    The leaves have all fallen off the trees.

    The temperature gets colder.

    The Bengals are eliminated from playoff contention.

    I guess one out of three isn’t bad.

    Who would have thought that at this time of the year it would be 70 degrees and the Bengals would be 7-2 and in first place in the AFC North? 

    Let me digress for just a moment and say that if this last weekend was an example of global warming, then keep it coming.  

  •  

    The Canadian government has enacted a law that could endanger the entire burley tobacco industry. U.S. tobacco growers need President Obama and the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) to ensure that the Canadians honor their trade obligations and that other countries do not follow Canada’s lead in banning American blend cigarettes.