.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • Have you considered becoming an election officer in Owen County?

    The election officers are a vital part of having a smooth, fair and accurate election.

    In order to serve as an election officer, you must attend election training sessions; you must also be a qualified registered voter. You can serve as a precinct officer as long as you will be 18 years old on or before the general election.

  • The snow finally arrived early this morning. It’s a measly three inches, but it’s better than nothing. I don’t know who is more relieved to see it – me or Bill, the nice weatherman on Channel 18.

  • For the past three weeks we have all seen the images. Each time we saw the horrific pictures flash across our screens we have each thought about what we can do about it.

    The stories coming out of Haiti have been filled with destruction, disbelief and despair. According to those who have come back, it is actually much worse.

    Already orphaned children are now wondering where they are going to end up. Other children who once had someone to take care of them are now orphaned.

  • A guest editorial about the Owen County dog shelter ran in last week’s paper. Due to space constraints some information was omitted. The following is the information that was not included. OCFA would like to express our gratitude to Editor John Whitlock and The News Herald for running the weekly ad and periodically updating the community on the shelter’s progress.

  • Owen County Friends of Animals Inc. has been working diligently to improve the plight of homeless dogs in Owen County since the organization’s inception in 2005.

    The organization began when 42 citizens addressed the fiscal court voicing concerns about the lack of care for dogs in the county’s custody. At that time dogs were housed in a dilapidated barn with no heat. The primary issue of concern was that 100 percent of the dogs that were picked up by the county were euthanized (a more gentle term for killed) regardless of their adoptability.

  • I would like to thank you for your editorial in the paper about our tea party and about us standing up for what we believe in and taking our rights to the streets and taking the time to meet instead of yelling at the TV while sitting in the comfort of our homes.

  • We have received many calls asking about Haiti. Our stateside director, Dave Zimmer, and a team left Jan. 19 to take much-needed food (beans and rice) and first aid. Pastor Ernst Cassy and the Children of Good Shepherd Orphanage are doing well. God protected them.

  • The U.S. Surgeon General has shown extensive evidence that exposure to secondhand smoke produces many severe health effects on one’s body, including immediate effects on the heart and blood vessels. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and the Institute of Medicine found that secondhand smoke exposure increases the risk of heart disease by 25-30 percent. The Institute also notes consistent evidence that communities have fewer heart attacks after they go smoke-free.

    We know that:

  • I was so glad when I read that Mrs. McBurney got the renting of the senior center building stopped. The people who forced this action should be ashamed of themselves, making the public pay for their orneriness. Cleaning up your mess and putting your toys away used to be a rule most people followed.

  • We’ve all had times in our lives when we received shocking news. You know the kind I am talking about. Like the time you found out that were either being hired or fired. Or maybe when you discovered that you were getting a tax refund or perhaps the moment came when the doctor said the word “twins.”

    All of these times brought about a different range of emotions. I would venture to say that when the news came down that you probably remember where you were and maybe even what the weather was.

  • Owen County may still be wrapped deep in winter but make no mistake, a new season is just around the corner – the political season.

    Normally, the big national elections get all the good press. The national and statewide stages are where most of the good ideological fights take place. Because most of the social, philosophical and economic issues that get so many people excited are determined at the higher levels of government, sometimes the importance of local elections are overlooked and voter turnout is significantly lower than state and national elections.

  • State looks for ways to improve education

    The Senate is moving forward through the 2010 regular session as committee meetings are now in full swing and the Senate has begun debating bills concerning education and state government.

  • Thank you for your article, “Perkins Pursues Research Dream,” in last week’s edition of the News Herald. 

    Thanks also to the Rotary Club for the opportunity to speak, and an advance thanks to the Owen County Chamber of Commerce.

    Within hours of the Rotary Club presentation on Dec. 14, we received a review from a representative of the National Institute of Health that stated, “The approach used here could potentially revolutionize the methods used in drug development.”

  • In Nebraska this week, it’s colder than the North Pole, I read. In Florida, the temperatures dipped below freezing. Here in Kentucky, life lies dormant in the frozen ground covered by snow. The trees, naked, reach their thin arms toward the heavens like a forest of Holocaust victims pleading for help. It’s January, the duplicitous month, named for the two-faced Roman god Janus who looked backwards and forwards at the same time. 

  • T. S. Elliot once wrote: “ For last year’s words belong to last year’s language. And next year’s words await another voice. And to make an end is to make a beginning.”

    Making a new beginning is what each new year offers to all of us. A blank page on which to record the daily joys, sorrows, mistakes, and accomplishments that define us as individuals.

    As we reflect on the past year, the Owen County Historical Society has much for which to be thankful.

  • And 2009 started off so promisingly ...

    The past 12 months have not been such a good stretch for the United States.

    We did have an historic inauguration in January 2009 but its been pretty downhill since then.

    The summer brought us discontent as the two sides in the health-care debate fought tooth and nail to have their voices and concerns heard.

    The economy sputtered along. Although the numbers later in the year started getting stronger, I don’t think anyone is ready or willing to say there will be a vast improvement in 2010.

  • As you may know by now, for the past three years the staff of the Owen County Clerk’s office has been working hard learning new technology. With this new technology and our commitment to serve we are looking forward to 2010.

    Election Day is coming in 2010. With my prediction of a record number of voters expected to arrive at the polls, the clerk’s office is working to make sure you have a smooth voting experience.

  • Bing Crosby may have dreamed of snow, but my Christmases in the Bluegrass have been mostly muddy, and have been better for it, in my opinion. I have, however, been stuck in a blizzard with a blind date on New Year’s Eve. Because of that singular experience New Year’s is painted forever white in my memory.

  • I guess I am drawn to stories about angels. I can’t let the Christmas season pass without the mention of all the angels we have as friends and neighbors in Owen County.

    You see every year the community angel tree is started around Thanksgiving. This year was no different. Nicole here at the office wanted to, “Put the tree up,” and me saying, “It’s too early.” We did prepare our spot in the office and decorated our tree and waited for the girls at the extension office to bring our angels to hang on it.

  • In the song “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” the composer laments that although he knows it’s a long road back, he promises to be home for Christmas. Reminiscing about the memories of home, he ends with the line: if only in my dreams.

     Whether near or far, whether returning home for Christmas or not, Owen countians cherish their memories of that special time of year by sharing traditions with their families, thus preserving their history and heritage.