• Who will pass on the stories of our ancestors? Who will embrace the variegated colors of everyday life and leave a memorably written record of the past?
    The responsibility of sharing someone’s life story belongs to family members, friends and all those who realize the treasure of the past and its impact on the future.
    Many delightful and moving stories of Owen countians are recalled and recorded  in the “Owen County, Kentucky Family History Book,” available from the historical society for $60.

  • Congressional committees are jokingly referred to as the place where bills go to die.  However, I’m happy to report that my bipartisan bill to audit the Federal Reserve passed the House Oversight and Government Reform committee by unanimous consent this summer, and is now eligible to come before the full House for a vote.  Since 90% of bills die in committee, you could say that my legislation had a near-death experience, but that’s a good thing.

  • In May 2015, I was like one of many college graduates that walked across the stage, shook hands with the dean, grasped the diploma cover and walked away. But I was one of the graduates that didn’t have life figured out. I had interviewed at several places both inside and outside of our particular company and didn’t have a full-time job lined up after graduation. The interviews and numerous job applications came to an end early in September when News-Herald Publisher Jeff Moore told me about this opening. It was a glimmer of light in what was otherwise a bleak summer.

  • Editor’s note: Owen County Judge-Executive Casey Ellis gave his second state of the county address July 14 at the Owen County Chamber of commerce breakfast meeting. The following is a transcription from a recording of the address.

  • We’ve reached a critical point in Kentucky – one where our prisons and jails are full, overdose deaths continue to rise and far too many children have parents who are imprisoned.

    We can no longer afford to cling to the outdated idea that prison is the only way to effectively hold people accountable for their crimes. Instead, we need to take a smarter, more measured approach to criminal justice.

  • “Oh! the old swimmin’-hole! In the long, lazy days

    When the humdrum of school made so many run-a-ways,

    How plesant was the jurney down the old dusty lane,

    Whare the tracks of our bare feet was all printed so plane

    You could tell by the dent of the heel and the sole

    They was lots o’ fun on hands at the old swimmin’-hole.” - James Whitcomb Riley

    Owen County Judge-Executive

    As we look forward to nicer weather, school being out for the summer and summer activities, I wanted to inform the citizens of Owen County about the road closure scheduled for June 1-30.

    There seems to be some confusion around this subject. The reality is one city block will be closed. That block is from the traffic light at East Adair to the Seminary Street traffic light (and just to the edge of the People’s Bank drive through).

  • You always hear of small town love, support and pride – but what does that really mean?

    Unlike John Mellencamp, I wasn’t born in a small town, but my family’s roots were pretty deep in one. Born and raised in Frankfort, we had the conveniences of more than a choice of either a burger or pizza and a bigger selection than the Dollar Store and Save-Way could provide.

    I guess I really didn’t understand it and fall into the mindset of loving the small-town atmosphere until I made Owen County my home in 2000.

  • I started my week in Frankfort in the presence of family, friends and my new colleagues in the Kentucky House of Representatives by holding my hand high and swearing an oath to represent the people of Scott, Owen, and Fayette counties to the very best of my ability.

  • Occasionally politicians slip up and reveal their true intentions. In DC, this is called “committing candor.” While indirectly discussing his administration’s effort in the courts to force Apple to develop a software key to unlock iPhones, President Obama recently admitted this battle is not just about a single terrorist’s iPhone in San Bernardino.

  • FRANKFORT – With the final weeks of the session looming, we are all too aware of the short timeline and the many important pieces of legislation, including the state’s budget, that we still need to move through the process before session ends.

    This week marked the 10th week in an already historic session in terms of the number of bills before the General Assembly. During this 60-day session, there were 937 bills filed with 309 originating in the Senate. This total is the most since the 1,030 filed in the 2008 session.

  • FRANKFORT – The Kentucky General Assembly crossed another mile marker this week by reaching the deadline for the introduction of new bills in the state Senate.

    With this deadline passed, we now have a more complete view of the issues lawmakers will take up this year. The bills address a mix of familiar issues and new problems. Some attempt to assist our citizens with disabilities while others address crimes perpetrated with technology our founding fathers could only imagine. Some measures drew bipartisan support while both parties vigorously debated others.

  • FRANKFORT – Now that we are in the second half of the session, we will see some of the legislature’s biggest issues – like the state’s biennial budget – brought to the forefront. For us, this means late nights and hard decisions as we work to reach a consensus on the most fiscally-responsible way to keep our state moving forward.

  • The seventh week of the 2016 General Assembly marked the halfway point of the 60-day session and saw the passage of a contested education measure that would change the evaluation method of the Kentucky Academic Standards.

    Critics have characterized the current standards as bureaucratic burdens that have kept teachers from teaching. Furthermore, the standards were misaligned with student assessments.

  • A celebrity sighting in the state Capitol as an award-winning Hollywood actress shared her passion for early childhood education was a highlight of the sixth week of the 2016 General Assembly.

    N-H Student Correspondent

    Hello, everyone. My name is Makenzie Davis and I am a senior at Owen County High School. I’m excited to join the News-Herald team as the High School Correspondent for the remainder of the school year.

    Check for my articles and pictures every week to see what’s going on in the high school through the eyes of a student: in-school events or activity highlights, organizations and club featurettes, and spotlights on succeeding students.

  • The major task of the General Assembly this session is to pass a $20 billion financial plan to carry Kentucky through the next two years. On Tuesday, the governor will present his budget recommendations through a joint session of the House of Representatives and Senate.

    While state senators wait to receive the general and transportation budget bills, they have used the first three weeks of the 2016 General Assembly to pass a series of other bills. This allows for discussion on those bills before the budget debate overshadows the remaining weeks of the session.

  • For this first quarterly article of 2016, I wish to update you on the current situation with our local hospital, clinic, EMS service and the availability of quality healthcare in Owen County.

  • The great radio talk host, Paul Harvey, once did a segment on firefighters. In his deep, monotone voice, he said that no one could really understand the mentality of a firefighter, not even a fireman.

    When most people are running out of the burning building, firefighters run in. Wives hate the hours and children love the noise and lights. It is one of the most dangerous jobs in the world, yet it’s the job that has the most early clock ins prior to the beginning of a shift.

  • Rep. Thomas Massie
    R-KY 4th District