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Opinion

  • Now that the wet/dry issue has been settled in Owenton for the foreseeable future, the public’s focus should be turned toward an epidemic that claims victims on an almost weekly basis in Owen County.
    If you talk to police in Owenton, you’ll find they respond to a potential overdose with shocking regularity. Recently at a meeting of the Owenton City Council, Owenton Police Chief Terry Gentry said his officers worked three overdoses in a single weekend.

  • Despite the fact there was no Fan Fair this year and it faces an uncertain future, the project was far from a failure.
    Everyone knew going in that luring people off U.S. 127 to stop in Owen County on their way to the Kentucky Speedway for the big NASCAR race would be difficult. The highway isn’t the main artery to the Speedway. Most of the traffic coming through Owenton would be people from Lexington and other areas of Kentucky who might not consider stopping for a break so close to the Speedway.

  • In my 25-plus years of working in the community newspaper business, I often get asked when I’m going to write about my extended family. (Keep in mind it’s usually my family that is doing the asking.)
    While I hail from Grant County now, my roots are in Owen County. My mother is Eula Smoot and my father was Buster Baker, both Owen County natives. My Granny Baker lived on Blanton Street, across from “the cheese factory” for many, many years.

  • The story is told about an old man who was having no luck at his favorite fishing hole. Try as he might, he could catch nothing. Meanwhile, a boy just down the way was pulling them out one after the other.
    Just as we might have done, the old man swallowed his pride and asked the boy how he was catching all those fish. The boy mumbled back something that sounded like “roo raf roo reep ra rums rarm.”
    “What was that?” the old fellow asked.
    The boy responded again: “Roo raf roo reep ra rums rarm.”

  • I would like to officially ask for your vote and support in the upcoming primary election. I am seeking the office of county clerk. My name is Kimberly “Kim” Smith. I currently work at Commonwealth Credit Union and have been there for over nine years. I deal with auto loans and I am a registered NMLS to assist with mortgage applications. I have worked with many of you over the years and if elected I vow to work hard for you. I have the skills needed to effectively run the clerk’s office and oversee the development the staff.

  • By Bill Lawson and Michael McMahon

  • People say that the true nature of a person is revealed in a time of crisis.
    If that’s the case, then the people of Owen County should be proud of the character that was on display during last week’s water crisis.

    •••••
    When the taps dried up last Tuesday morning, nearly every group, department, business, organization, congregation and agency jumped into action.

  • Operation Christmas Child, a project of international Christian relief and evangelism organization Samaritan’s Purse, uses simple gift-filled shoe boxes to let children all over the world know that they are loved and not forgotten.
    Samaritan’s Purse started Operation Christmas Child in 1993, collecting just 23,000 shoe boxes. To date, we’ve collected over 100 million shoe boxes that have been delivered to needy children in more than 130 countries. That represents less than 5 percent of the children currently in the world, which is where you come in.

  • Calling all prayer warriors to the former Saveway parking lot on Nov. 9 at 1 p.m.
    THRIVE is a youth group led by 17-year-old Logan Armstrong from Richmond, who have been called to Owen County to pray for God’s deliverance from the disease of addiction for our community and especially our youth.
     If you are a prayer warrior and believe that God can still work miracles, we invite you to stand with us on the promises of Matthew 7:7; 18:20 and join us on our knees to pray for Owen County.

  • The Owen County Community Leadership Program organized by the Owen County Extension Council, had its fourth meeting last week.

  • I love my dog.
    She was a gift for my oldest daughter Elizabeth and the honor of naming the new puppy was left up to her.
    Being an 8-year-old little girl, Elizabeth chose “Cupcake.”
    Not since my friend Billy Johnson named his three-legged Irish setter “Speedy Gonzales” has an animal had a less appropriate name.
    When I got her from an animal shelter nearly nine years ago, she was excitable, sweet, fun, smart and mostly obedient.

  • By the time you read this, Mary will be gone and we will all miss her.
    When you have worked in newspapers as long as I have, you tend to get a little jaded. Reporters have seen a lot, done a lot and heard a lot of stories. Sometimes, a reporter or an editor has to have a fresh set of eyes to see what is in front of them.
    That’s what Mary Alford brought to the News-Herald this summer.
    She was hired for a 10-week summer intern program through the Kentucky Press Association.

  • I would like to nominate my mother Bonnie Woodyard for the 2013 Mother of the Year award.
    Mom was born and raised in Owen County. She attended Lusby Mill School during her elementary years. She graduated from Owen County High School in 1960 at the age of 16. Mom married my father in 1961. They have been happily married for 52 years. Mom drove a school bus for the Owen County School System for almost 40 years. She also worked alongside my father to operate a dairy and tobacco farm. She has been a Sunday school teacher for as long as I can remember.

  •  

    Independence Day is our country’s most patriotic of holidays, chock-full of flags, fireworks and family festivities.  It is a day when we Americans proudly wear red, white and blue as an expression of our devotion for the greatest country in the world. 

  • In this week’s News-Herald, you can read a story outlining some of the new laws that will soon go into effect in Kentucky on June 25.
    From my days covering the General Assembly, I learned that some laws are simply passed to appease a certain group or to make a political statement.
    This year, the General Assembly enacted several new laws that will truly help the people of the commonwealth.
    Here are some of my thoughts on some of the new laws:

  • Are people outraged the federal government could be tracking your phone calls, Internet usages and email?

    No.

    Are people stunned the federal government could be tracking your phone calls, Internet usages and email?

    No.

    Are people even somewhat surprised the federal government could be tracking your phone calls, Internet usages and email?

    No.

  • After finishing my first legislative session as majority floor leader, I am proud to look back at the significant accomplishments of the 2013 Regular Session of the General Assembly.  Most importantly, we successfully established a new spirit of bipartisan collaboration which allowed us to move the state forward in a meaningful fashion on substantive issues such as comprehensive public employee pension system reform, university bonding, a regulatory framework for hemp production, and added transparency for special taxing districts.

  • Did you realize that out of the 16 million veterans who participated in WWII, there are only about a 1.5 million still living.  The U.S. is losing 800  to 1,000 WWII veterans every day, which means in five years most of the “Greatest Generation” will be gone.  

  • All 120 counties across the state of Kentucky have at least one thing in common at this time of the year. I call it “March Madness” and it has nothing to do with playing ball or shopping. In the county clerk’s office it is time for the renewals of all trucks, trailers and farm tags.  I encourage you not to wait until the last working day of the month, because the lines are always long at the end of March.  Be sure that you bring your last years registration and insurance with you.

  • As tthe General Assembly moves into the final eight days of this short session, the Senate continues to direct its focus on saving taxpayers’ dollars, using a bipartisan approach to solving the Commonwealth’s most pressing and important issues.