• Dealing with dead animals is a reality for any livestock owner.  There have been laws on the books for years as far as how to dispose of them, but for the most part, they’ve been somewhat impractical and very expensive for the small farmer who had an animal die on their farm.
    Because of this, many farmers have been dragging dead animals to an out-of-the-way place on the farm and letting the buzzards and coyotes dispose of the carcass.

  • 4-H Afterschool Flower and Vegetable Project
    On May 5,  Owen County 4-H will be hosting the annual Afterschool Flower and Vegetable Project.
    If you are interested in planting flowers and vegetables, this is the program for you. All youth age 9 – 18 are invited to attend. 
    Please call the Owen County Extension Office at 484-5703 by April 29 to sign up.
    4-H Variety Show

  • April Dawn Petrey recently celebrated her 23rd birthday. She is the mother of Mikey and Tommy.

  • Please join the Pryor family in celebrating June’s 90th birthday from 2 to 4 p.m. April 30 at the Owen County Extension Building at 357 Ellis Road in Owenton. No gifts, please.

  • Carl and Sue Henage will celebrate their 40th wedding anniversary May 8, 2011. In recognition of this anniversary, a reception will be held from 2:30 to 5 p.m. May 1 at the New Columbus Baptist Church.
    The reception is being hosted by their sons and families, Jason and Karen Henage, Hannah, Ella, Kate and Sophie, Eric and Brooke Henage, Ava-Kate, Benjamin, Samuel and Luke Henage.
    The couple requests your presence, but no gifts.

  • Every year I write about mulch but no ones seems to care. Mounds of mulch still choke the trunks of trees everywhere you look this time of the year. Trees in landscapes look like telephone poles sticking out of soon-to-be-crusted-over black mulch. How’s that for a foreboding tale. Here’s the message, too much mulch is a bad thing. I know, some people have been liberated but we still have some more work to do. The bottom line: 2 inches of coarse mulch that is not piled around the trunk of the tree or shrub is the desired goal.

  • Kendall Rae Woodyard is celebrating her first birthday, April 14, 2011. She is the daughter of Justice Switzer Woodyard and Johnathan B. Woodyard. Kendall is pictured here with Granny, Edith Switzer.

  • Clint Hamilton, right, was one of 50 accounting majors from across the country chosen to participate in Deloitte Touche’s  alternative spring break in Washington, D.C. The college students worked with Deloitte accountants and consultants and United Way professionals on various projects benefitting inner-city D.C. children.
    Deloitte is very involved with the U.S. Olympic team and will be a corporate sponsor of the 2012 Games. Olympic speed skating gold medalist Apolo Ohno, left, spoke to the students about leadership and community involvement.

  • The Service to Youth Award was presented to Josiah Hollis, Carlisa Hollis, Nicholas Kaelin and Anthony Saat for their contributions to Owen County Venture Scouts, Boys Scouts and Cub Scouts. Many hours of volunteer services have been spent to lend a hand to all scouting activities.
    The Meritorious Service Award was presented to Felicia Hollis for many years of unselfish services to Owen County Scouts as well as the Trailblazer District. The Trailblazer District covers all scouting units for northern Kentucky.

  • Debbie Whobrey of Petals on the Square took time to decorate her shop in anticipation of this year’s Owen County Relay for Life.

  • Three OCHS students presented speeches to the Owen County Rotary Club March 20 at its weekly meeting at the Smith House Restaurant.
    Danielle Hoop, Dakoda Trenary and Blake Chancery addressed the Rotary Club with speeches they wrote as part of the annual Rotary District 6710 Speech Contest.
    This year’s theme was “Building Communities … Bridging Continents.” The contest was held at OCHS March 11.

  • Debra Dawson of Owenton would like to announce the adoption of her three children — Ashleyann, Andrew and Rhiannon Dawson.
    All three children have been part of the Dawson family for almost four years with the adoption completed Aug. 10, 2010.
    Welcoming the children into the family were siblings: Danielle Chase of Louisville, Lyndsey Arey of Owenton, Wade Howard of Las Vegas, Nev., Samantha Smith of Owenton, Charles Chase Jr. of Owenton, and Spencer Wilcoxson of Owenton. Other family members include Kris Smith of Owenton and Mike Meyer of Louisville.

  • The Northern Kentucky Truck Tuggers are hosting a benefit April 9 at the Owen County Fairgrounds in honor of William Tackett, who died in a car accident last year when he was 26 years old, and his son Braydon, who died two months later.
    Proceeds from the event will go to help erect tombstones on their graves.
    Lisa Stewart,  William’s mother and Braydon’s grandmother, arranged for a nice funeral service and burial for her babies and has only recently been able to pay off those expenses.

  • Six Owen County teens attended the 2011 4-H District No. 3 Teen Retreat in northern Kentucky. Owen County was one of nine counties represented at the annual retreat where 45 youth were in attendance. At the retreat, the youth attended workshops on creativity and leadership, building relationships, healthy snacks, and stress management. Representing Owen County (from left to right) were Allyson Beverly, Kara Knochelmann, Samantha Perkins, Gracie Roberts, Olivia Karsner, and Claire True.

  • Several students with connections to Owen County were recently invited to serve as pages for members of the Kentucky General Assembly.

  • Farmers are encouraged to stop by the local Farm Service Agency to make their annual report. For any producers raising small grains, including wheat, your last day to report those crops is May 31.

    DCP sign-up begins
    For those producers eligible for the Direct and Counter-cyclical Program, the deadline for applications is June 1. This is a mandatory deadline for all participants and USDA will not accept any late-file applications. Signatures of all producers receiving a share in DCP payments are required by the June 1 deadline.

  • Most Owen County farmers have an abundance of cedar trees on their land. And, most think that there is absolutely no economic value to the trees, other than holding the world together and providing some wildlife habitat.
    Eastern red cedar might be a bit overlooked, despite it being the most widely distributed conifer in the eastern United States. The University of Kentucky Extension Service is providing a workshop, “Got Cedar? Now What?” to outline some management and marketing options.

  • Controlling certain weeds takes some strategic planning and during mid-March, the game begins. I personally don’t care about weeds in the lawn but I do try to keep them out of the landscape beds and the vegetable garden. I also prefer to approach the whole affair with as little chemical input as possible, so I have developed a well-timed strategy of hand-weeding, mulching, using corn gluten as a pre-emergent and a little flame-throwing. I’ll explain.