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Guest Editorials

  • Special mute button not included

    If I could change one thing about my husband, it would be to end his incessant control of the TV remote. No one but the Lord himself could understand the logic behind watching a good movie and then watch your husband use the remote to channel-hop during each commercial break to see what else is on.

  • No cease fire in the battle of the bulge

    Guest columnist - Nancy Gaston

    Everyone knows that eating three to five servings of vegetables each day is necessary for good health. Howver, what if you’re like me and hate most of the vegetable kingdom? Would it be acceptable to count hash browns and French-fried potatoes as part of that daily vegetable requirement? On the other hand, is it necessary to adorn my cheese-crust-filled frozen pizza with thin slices of carrots and celery?

  • Public health fund has lasting impact on lives of Owen citizens

    Everyone knows that eating healthy foods and getting regular exercise are crucial to a healthy lifestyle. We know that smoking puts us at risk for preventable diseases and that quitting helps lessen those risks. These facts are common knowledge today because of the decades of work local health departments and other public health agencies have done to arm us with the information and resources we need to make healthy choices.

  • Guest Editorial: Session saw passage of several bills

    By Damon Thayer
    Now that the 2011 General Assembly has adjourned, I wanted to review some of the legislation enacted this year.  As chairman of the Senate State and Local Government Committee, I made sure that we took action on key pieces of legislation that will impact the lives of many Kentuckians.

  • Democrats should help override vetoes

    During the special session last week, the Senate created a responsible approach to solving the Medicaid budget shortfall. The House of Representatives agreed with the Senate plan and the bill was sent to Gov. Steve Beshear’s desk. However, late Friday, March 25, the governor vetoed all of the important accountability provisions and is now left with an unrestricted checkbook combined with an unlimited credit card funded with your tax dollars.

  • Senate Republicans ready for veto

    The taxpayer scored a legislative victory this week when the House passed the Senate’s Medicaid budget proposal during the current special session.
    Throughout the course of the Medicaid debate, the Governor and the Secretary of Health and Family Services have both been adamant that they can come up with $139 million in efficiencies and managed care to fill the Medicaid budget shortfall over the upcoming fiscal year. In the Senate, we feel it is our responsibility to trust, but verify their assumptions.

  • Technology continues to change county clerk’s office

    The routine world of regulations, laws, and practices, accompanied by legislation, court decisions and  agreements’ have led to changes in the Owen County Clerk’s Office.

  • House calls for end to furloughs

    Over the course of the last week, the Kentucky House of Representatives honored fallen military members and their families in a solemn, moving ceremony in the House chamber. This tradition began in 2004 and the service has become one of the most significant experiences of the session.

  • Senators seek balanced budget amendment

    This week, the Senate passed legislation dealing with issues facing our federal budget deficit, the election recount process, and measures dealing with veterans and military service personnel.
    This week, United States Senator Rand Paul testified before a meeting I chaired of the State and Local Government Committee. Later in the day, he addressed the full Senate and spoke of how public officials need to take action to rein in out-of-control government spending.

  • Bill aims at reducing crime in Kentucky

    This has been perhaps the busiest week of the 2011 session and many pieces of important legislation addressing education, Kentucky’s criminal justice system, and government have been passed out of the House of Representatives.
    One of the most highly publicized bills that cleared the House this week is the result of six months of work, research, and collaboration between legislators, judges, substance abuse counselors, hospitals, jailers, administration officials and others.