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Bonnie Strassell - Owen County Historical Society

  • Owen Historical Society News: Music, food and stories of past highlight picnic

  • Owen Historical Society News: Court day was the forerunner of Sweet Owen Day

    Dust whirled about as buggies and farm wagons made their way along Owenton streets in the early 1900s. The occasion was County Court Day and the enthused Owen County crowd bought, bartered, and bargained for the best deals of the day.
    Most looked forward to this event which was held on the fourth Monday of the month. Many who attended were farmers who came to town, transacted their business  and returned home in time to milk.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Owen County was no stranger to large families

    History is an account of events in either a written or narrative form. But what makes history exciting is the character of the people involved who enhance those events with their own personality, adding a dimension of life, color and movement.
    Owen countians have always been intrinsically intertwined with the past, and many have recorded their hopes, dreams and sorrows in diaries and books or have passed them down in family stories.

  • Owen Historical Society News: What role did your family play in Owen history?

    I never knew you. Your name has always eluded me. Mama and Papa never mentioned you, but perhaps they were too busy making a living on the farm in Owen county. I’m sure you knew how much work it was to put in a crop of tobacco. In March or April seed was sown in the burned plant beds. Transplanting was done in May or June and the whole family worked together as the kids carefully dropped plants in rows and the adults set them. Work continued as the fragile plants were carefully cultivated with plows, hoes, and by hand.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Sharing stories of our agricultural heritage

     The tall grasses of Kentucky gave way to the mighty bison. These great shaggy beasts created trails leading to the salt licks and rivers that dotted the land. Trails that were further defined by the moccasin feet of the American Indian.
    In 1775, Daniel Boone and 30 men completed the first trail through the Cumberland Mountains. It moved through the Alleghenies at Cumberland Gap, at what is now the junction of the state boundaries of Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia. Heading northwest, it split at Hazel Patch, one route creating Boonesborough, the other Frankfort.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Newspaper continues as link to past, future

    The pungent smell of oil-based ink wafted through the building, and its presence was ever evident on fingertips. Sounds in the background intermingled as the linotype machine operator tapped out words into sentences; and the cylinder press, picking up a bit of ink, rolled across the type form and performed its noteworthy job of printing the newspaper.
    Welcome to the office of the News-Herald in the 1950s-1970s. Jane Yancey Ayres well remembers those days of frantically working to publish the weekly paper for Owen countians. 

  • Owen Historical Society News: The call of riverboats lured many boys to the banks

    Meet Charlie Moormon. The slender, whiskered gentleman from the Cincinnati Museum Center presented a program on riverboats at the historical society meeting July 12.  His love of the river and the steamboats which once crowded its expanse was evident as he relived the early days of steam powered boats and the vital role they played in the history of America.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Pawpaws were a treat for explorers, settlers and kids

    “Pickin’ up pawpaws, puttin’ ‘em in your pocket,
    Way down yonder in the pawpaw patch.”

    The preservation of our history includes passing down family stories and songs, and recording important events. But another vital element of preserving our past is planting and cultivating heirloom flowers, crops, and trees. This piece of our history also keeps our traditions alive and serves to enrich our lives.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Farming history is linked to these machines

    Displaying a variety of colors and sizes they proudly lined up side by side. Some quite obviously showed their age, and although they certainly had more experience, nevertheless they didn’t seem to mind sharing the limelight with the younger set. They boasted names such as Minneapolis Moline, Farmall, Allis-Chalmers, Power King, Massey-Ferguson, and Ford 8N.

  • Owen Historical Society News: The American flag is a symbol of freedom

    “The American flag is a symbol of freedom. But freedom isn’t free.”

    The truth of these words was emphasized June 14 in a poignant historical society program presented by Pastor Jim Wood. Brother Wood not only shepherds the flock at New Liberty Christian Church, but is also the designated chaplain of an organization called Flags4Vets. Jim is a veteran of the United States Army and continues his service to our country by joining thousands of volunteers dedicated to placing flags on the graves of veterans every Memorial Day and Veterans Day.