.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Bonnie Strassell - Owen County Historical Society

  • Stafford presents engaging program for historical society

    She’s a home-grown girl and her down-home humor danced about the room like a tonic.
    Owen County Mother of the Year is just one of her titles, but on any given day, whatever hat Melody Stafford wears is sure to be overflowing with love and laughter, at times accompanied by lively antics.

  • Local grandmothers leave lasting memories

    Some seem to be made up of all angles and sharp turns, and they never forget good manners. Others are pillow-soft, whose laps are wide and inviting and whose deep laughter somersaults from one end of a room to the other.

    They are known as grandmother, grandma, granny, mamaw, nana or some other term of endearment, and they fill our bellies with treats, our hearts with joy and our lives with a touch of magic.

  • Entertainment in abundance for early Owen countians

    Early Kentucky settlers had little time to socialize. The arduous work of building cabins in the wilderness, providing food for their families and battling Indians and the elements provided limited opportunities for quilting bees, rifle frolics and square dances.

    By the middle 1800s communities had sprung up in the Owen County area, and churches were formed to provide folks a place to hear the Word of God. Church gatherings also gave countians the opportunity to socialize with neighbors and friends.

  • Cemetery tour tells stories of past Owen countians

    The small granite marker seemed insignificant surrounded by larger, more elaborately carved tombstones. The name etched on top of the stone, Colorado Grant, was unknown to most, yet the man buried beneath the gravestone truly touched the lives of Owen countians in the early 1900s, for he gave them a glimpse of the western frontier.

    On a hot day a few weeks ago, as sunlight bounced off tombstones and baked visitors, the Owen County Historical Society and the Owen County Public Library joined together to visit Owen County’s past.

  • Blue Wing Inn shines light on Ky. history

    Though seemingly endless, the narrow winding road eventually reaches its destination at Browns Bottom, where the historic  Blue Wing Inn welcomes visitors.

    Formerly the summer home of Mason Brown, the inn was built circa 1850. Its Greek Revival architecture is punctuated by  gingerbread trim galloping delightfully around the house, adding character to the exterior.

  • Young Owen countians overcome early childhood struggle

    In the 1800s famine hit Ireland and more than 2 million Irish immigrated to America. The Brown family was part of this seemingly unending wave of starving yet determined people who looked to a new life and a new land of opportunity.

    The Browns settled in Virginia, and not long after the births of their children, both died, leaving behind four young orphans.

  • Farm-fresh biscuits were cornerstone of Owen's cuisine

    “Certainly no bread in America has been more popular over a longer time than baking powder biscuits. In fact, in many homes they were baked three times a day in great quantities, and were eaten hot, with butter and honey or preserves, along with every meal.” James Beard, 1881.

  • Owen Co. remains ‘home’ for those who have traveled far and wide

    Perhaps it’s memories of the lay of the land or reminisces of our childhood that evoke a longing for the place of our birth. Maybe it’s the remembrance of parents and grandparents whose daily lives reflected an era of the hardworking folks that helped create a prosperous and enduring America.
    Whatever the reason for our nostalgia, the stories of our lives give insight into our past and are treasures to share with future generations.

  • Ky. caves aided in gunpowder production during War of 1812

    The War of 1812 saw Kentuckians volunteering by the hundred of thousands. Many would never set their sights on home again; yet the dream of a nation, unfettered by the yoke of the British crown and free from the constant harassment of Indians, compelled them to fight.

  • Former News-Herald editor documented early Owen Co. life

    John Forsee, an early editor of the News-Herald and native Owen countian, wrote a history of the county in 1936 under the Federal Writers’ Project. This project was created in 1935 as part of the United States WPA program to provide employment for historians, teachers, writers, and librarians. Its purpose was not only to help these white collar workers but to focus on the historic and cultural resources of the United States.