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Bonnie Strassell - Owen County Historical Society

  • Owen Historical Society News: Dairies were a fixture in Owen’s past

    Her thickly lashed gentle eyes gazing from the photo reflected a serene spirit. Despite her size she was well proportioned, and like many of her kind she holds a special place in the hearts of those who care for her.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Post offices were local cornerstones

    “Dear Mom and all,
    I’m writing you a few lines to say hello and tell you that I’m getting along fine. Well Mom, we left Missouri Monday and arrived in Louisiana Tuesday about 12 o’clock. Well Mom I don’t have much to say, but I’ll give you my address anyway … tell them all hello and give them my best wishes … it’s awful beautiful out here and the trees are all pine. Well, I’ll have more time to write the next time.
    Love, Marvin”

  • Owen Historical Society News: A glimpse into the origins of phrases

    He loves me, he loves me not, he loves me, he loves me not…
    Many a young girl recites these words as she pulls petals off a flower. The purpose is to reveal the true intent of an admirer.
    Sayings, superstitions and old wives tales were tucked away in the memories and embedded in the culture of early Owen County settlers. Most were of Scotch-Irish, German and English descent, and along with their few belongings, they brought a rich legacy of these sayings  from Europe to the New World.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Mr. Lincoln was our special Valentine

    He was a yarn-spinner and a rail-splitter. He was mostly self-educated but went on to become a storekeeper, a lawyer and the president of the United States.
    He and his future wife were both born in Kentucky. He came into the world in a rough-hewn cabin, she in a luxurious home in Lexington. He was famous for his wit, honesty, and compassion; all of which served him well as he led this divided country during a most volatile tragic time.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Snakes be wary of Owen Co. ladies

    Many may recall the old saying, “There’s more than one way to skin a cat.” After spending the afternoon celebrating the 96th birthday of Monterey resident and historical society member Lela Maude Hawkins, I discovered there is more than one way to kill a snake.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Songs of war become part of legacy

    “When our boys have crossed the ocean. There to die in No Man’s Land
    Oh, what true and brave devotion. As we see them take their stand.
    We will pray for their returning. And we’ll keep the home fires burning;
    We will one and all be true. While our boys are nobly dying
    For the flag. Red, White and Blue.”

  • Owen Historical Society News: Poplar Grove has a history of its own

    It stands atop a slight rise facing Highway 127. Its alabaster exterior evokes a picturesque portrait of a country church waiting to usher a community of believers into a worshipful haven. Though small, the vestibule has the honor of both welcoming visitors and members; and  is a place at the end of a service for handshaking as the congregation adamantly declares approval of the sermon.
    For almost 100 years, the small, white church has faithfully served the community of Poplar Grove in northern Owen County.

  • Owen Historical Society News: History from another perspective

    They say that I am old. That is true; and yet I was not one of the first to gaze upon the land we know today as Owen County. It has been said that the McAfees were some of  the first white men to explore the area in 1773.They made camp at the mouth of Mill Creek where present day Perry Park stands.
    When other families arrived the forests were cleared, cabins were erected; and soon on every farm those like me settled on the land; and in doing so we took our place in the annals of history.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Shopping was an adventure

    Somehow the conversation always seemed to revert back to history.
    Though the occasion was a birthday party for historical society member Margaret Alice Murphy, the ghosts of Owen countians took center stage.
    Stories of hucksters and Owen County general stores brought the phantoms to life and created a lively atmosphere in which to reminisce.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Hunting was part of youth