.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Bonnie Strassell - Owen County Historical Society

  • Owen Co. doctors prevailed during 20th century

    “I will use treatment to help the sick according to my ability and judgment, but never with a view to injury and wrong-doing. Into whatsoever houses I enter, I will enter to help the sick, and I will abstain from all intentional wrong-doing and harm.”
    The above quote was taken from the Hippocratic Oath which was a solemn promise historically taken by physicians. It was first used in Greece and was one of the most widely known of Greek medical texts. Originally the oath required a new physician to swear to uphold specific ethical standards.

  • Owen County was caught in the crossfire of the Civil War

    Owen County was caught in the crossfire of the Civil War. Though occupied by the Union Army by 1862, most county residents sympathized with the Southern cause, and although some Owen countians joined Union forces, a great number joined the Confederate Army.
    Civil War stories are entrenched in family histories, and many have been recorded. Historian and riverman, Charlie Johnson, has written many Civil War articles featuring Owen countians and many are included in a new book currently being published by the Owen County Historical Society.

  • Owen Co. remains ‘home’ for those who have traveled far and wide

    Perhaps it’s memories of the lay of the land or reminisces of our childhood that evoke a longing for the place of our birth. Maybe it’s the remembrance of parents and grandparents whose daily lives reflected an era of the hardworking folks that helped create a prosperous and enduring America.
    Whatever the reason for our nostalgia, the stories of our lives give insight into our past and are treasures to share with future generations.

  • Ky. caves aided in gunpowder production during War of 1812

    The War of 1812 saw Kentuckians volunteering by the hundred of thousands. Many would never set their sights on home again; yet the dream of a nation, unfettered by the yoke of the British crown and free from the constant harassment of Indians, compelled them to fight.

  • Former News-Herald editor documented early Owen Co. life

    John Forsee, an early editor of the News-Herald and native Owen countian, wrote a history of the county in 1936 under the Federal Writers’ Project. This project was created in 1935 as part of the United States WPA program to provide employment for historians, teachers, writers, and librarians. Its purpose was not only to help these white collar workers but to focus on the historic and cultural resources of the United States.

  • Old camp meeting sometimes lasted from several days to weeks

    As the oppressive heat of August bears down upon Owen County, local churches make preparations for their annual revivals.
    Revivals, or camp meetings as they were called in early Kentucky, beckoned the faithful and the penitent and presented the opportunity to listen to sermons, enjoy fellowship with other believers, partake in communion, and renew one’s Christian walk.
    An entry in Mariam Houchens’ book, “The History of Owen County, Kentucky,” written by Mrs. Ira L. Arnold, described a Squiresville Baptist revival in August 1900.

  • Alfred Cobb's narrative provides glimpse into frontier life

    In the 1830s the Second Great Awakening spread like wildfire across frontier Kentucky planting deep religious roots along the way.
    During the same decade, the hero of the Battle of New Orleans, Andrew Jackson, was reelected president, the Oregon Trail beckoned the out to the western frontier and staunch American patriots were slaughtered at the Battle of the Alamo.

  • Stafford presents engaging program for historical society

    She’s a home-grown girl and her down-home humor danced about the room like a tonic.
    Owen County Mother of the Year is just one of her titles, but on any given day, whatever hat Melody Stafford wears is sure to be overflowing with love and laughter, at times accompanied by lively antics.

  • Local grandmothers leave lasting memories

    Some seem to be made up of all angles and sharp turns, and they never forget good manners. Others are pillow-soft, whose laps are wide and inviting and whose deep laughter somersaults from one end of a room to the other.

    They are known as grandmother, grandma, granny, mamaw, nana or some other term of endearment, and they fill our bellies with treats, our hearts with joy and our lives with a touch of magic.

  • Entertainment in abundance for early Owen countians

    Early Kentucky settlers had little time to socialize. The arduous work of building cabins in the wilderness, providing food for their families and battling Indians and the elements provided limited opportunities for quilting bees, rifle frolics and square dances.

    By the middle 1800s communities had sprung up in the Owen County area, and churches were formed to provide folks a place to hear the Word of God. Church gatherings also gave countians the opportunity to socialize with neighbors and friends.