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Bonnie Strassell - Owen County Historical Society

  • Owen Historical Society News: Miss Wilma still a ‘piece of work’

    She was known as the “White Tornado” and “Road Runner.”
    No one is sure whether she ever shouted “beep, beep” as she streaked past, but her energy was boundless, and when she went places her feet hit the ground running. It was as if life was so full she didn’t want to miss any part of it.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Love and marriage is a foundation of history

    “Marriage does not only consist of gazing at each other, but rather it involves looking together in the same direction.”

    These words of early twentieth century French author, Antoine de Saint-Exupery, remind us that a successful marriage involves working together toward common goals.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Even a spoon can carry a lot of history

    It seemed to be just another old wooden spoon, yet the tiny cracks that traversed the worn handle added to the spoon’s character and emphasized the wood’s rich hues.
    The wooden spoon had served generations of Owen countians, and despite its age, was poised as if ready to stir a pot of simmering soup or scrape out the last remains of fried potatoes from an iron skillet.
    Wooden spoons were a necessary part of Kentucky frontier life.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Farmers produced history

    They are at the heart of America’s success. Weather does not deter them from their commitment to their families, their communities and the American people.
    With little thanks, they work from sun up to sunset, and they take pride in their labors as they dedicate themselves to the preservation of the land and the gifts that spring forth from the ground.
    They are America’s farming families.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Happy Orville Rogers Day

    They stood side by side in a long row. Many looked similar but each carried features that were unique. Several were over 100-years-old, and yet their appearance was as vibrant as the younger ones.
    Although today they have been replaced by advanced technology, their stories remain and are engrafted into history.
    In the 1800s, men from several different countries were working on an invention to transmit the sound of the voice over wire.
    The gentleman credited as the inventor of the first practical telephone was Scotsman Alexander Graham Bell. 

  • Owen Historical Society: Find our heroes in the fields

    In Flanders fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses, row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below ...
       
    “In Flanders Field” is a poem written during World War I by doctor and Lt. Col. John McCrae.

  • Owen Historical Society News – Riddle added to rich history of Owen County

    Someone once said, “God pours life into death and death into life without a drop being spilled.”
    In rural Owen County, the loss of a loved one is accepted as part of everyday life.
    Author and storyteller Charlotte Ann Kemper Atchison described the days of mourning experienced by early Owen County families.
    Charlotte grew up on Bucks Run and wrote of the times in her childhood when a deceased family member was washed and dressed in his or her finest, and placed in the parlor for viewing.

  • Owen County Historical Society News: Nothing could match sassafras

    Spring heralds not only the earth’s renewal of sprouting grasses, budding trees and blooming flowers, but during the early 1900s it also reminded Owen County mothers of the necessity to boost their children’s immune systems after the effects of winter.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Though block houses are gone, stories remain

    The designs varied but the purpose was uniform – defense of the Kentucky railway system during the Civil War. Block houses which could hold up to 20 men were constructed by the Union along train tacks that traversed the Bluegrass.
    These were manned by federal soldiers whose job it was to thwart Confederate raids designed to interfere with northern supply routes.
    Author and historian Charles Bogart was the guest speaker last week at the historical society meeting, and using Power Point, he illustrated the construction of these fortifications.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Riding the rails of Civil War history

    When her 5-year-old son vanished from the backyard, Mrs. Bogart knew just where to find him. Perched on the platform that held the icehouse, Charles Bogart would be watching the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad trains chugging by. 
    The Bogarts lived in Newport and according to Charles, “There was nothing between us and the tracks.”