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Bonnie Strassell - Owen County Historical Society

  • Owen Historical Society News – Riddle added to rich history of Owen County

    Someone once said, “God pours life into death and death into life without a drop being spilled.”
    In rural Owen County, the loss of a loved one is accepted as part of everyday life.
    Author and storyteller Charlotte Ann Kemper Atchison described the days of mourning experienced by early Owen County families.
    Charlotte grew up on Bucks Run and wrote of the times in her childhood when a deceased family member was washed and dressed in his or her finest, and placed in the parlor for viewing.

  • Owen County Historical Society News: Nothing could match sassafras

    Spring heralds not only the earth’s renewal of sprouting grasses, budding trees and blooming flowers, but during the early 1900s it also reminded Owen County mothers of the necessity to boost their children’s immune systems after the effects of winter.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Though block houses are gone, stories remain

    The designs varied but the purpose was uniform – defense of the Kentucky railway system during the Civil War. Block houses which could hold up to 20 men were constructed by the Union along train tacks that traversed the Bluegrass.
    These were manned by federal soldiers whose job it was to thwart Confederate raids designed to interfere with northern supply routes.
    Author and historian Charles Bogart was the guest speaker last week at the historical society meeting, and using Power Point, he illustrated the construction of these fortifications.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Riding the rails of Civil War history

    When her 5-year-old son vanished from the backyard, Mrs. Bogart knew just where to find him. Perched on the platform that held the icehouse, Charles Bogart would be watching the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad trains chugging by. 
    The Bogarts lived in Newport and according to Charles, “There was nothing between us and the tracks.”

  • Legacy of Owen WWI veteran lives on

    Perennial rose bushes grace either side of the monument; and for the past 90 years they have faithfully sent forth abundant blossoms. It is as if the rose bushes themselves acknowledge the great service rendered by the soldier whose remains rest beneath the ground under their outstretched roots.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Owen men served John Hunt Morgan

    He stood six feet tall. His finely chiseled face was framed by curly brown hair, and according to an admirer, his gray eyes “reflected strength of character.”
    One Northern newspaper branded him “the king of horse thieves, a bandit, a freebooter, no better than a thug,” while in the South he was admired as “the thunderbold of the Confederacy.” Most Owen countians supported his cause, embraced his ideology and offered him sanctuary whenever he visited the area.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Dairies were a fixture in Owen’s past

    Her thickly lashed gentle eyes gazing from the photo reflected a serene spirit. Despite her size she was well proportioned, and like many of her kind she holds a special place in the hearts of those who care for her.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Post offices were local cornerstones

    “Dear Mom and all,
    I’m writing you a few lines to say hello and tell you that I’m getting along fine. Well Mom, we left Missouri Monday and arrived in Louisiana Tuesday about 12 o’clock. Well Mom I don’t have much to say, but I’ll give you my address anyway … tell them all hello and give them my best wishes … it’s awful beautiful out here and the trees are all pine. Well, I’ll have more time to write the next time.
    Love, Marvin”

  • Owen Historical Society News: A glimpse into the origins of phrases

    He loves me, he loves me not, he loves me, he loves me not…
    Many a young girl recites these words as she pulls petals off a flower. The purpose is to reveal the true intent of an admirer.
    Sayings, superstitions and old wives tales were tucked away in the memories and embedded in the culture of early Owen County settlers. Most were of Scotch-Irish, German and English descent, and along with their few belongings, they brought a rich legacy of these sayings  from Europe to the New World.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Mr. Lincoln was our special Valentine

    He was a yarn-spinner and a rail-splitter. He was mostly self-educated but went on to become a storekeeper, a lawyer and the president of the United States.
    He and his future wife were both born in Kentucky. He came into the world in a rough-hewn cabin, she in a luxurious home in Lexington. He was famous for his wit, honesty, and compassion; all of which served him well as he led this divided country during a most volatile tragic time.