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Bonnie Strassell - Owen County Historical Society

  • Great care used to comfort families

    He is long and lanky and stands head and shoulders above most everyone else.
    Although he lives in Carroll County, his roots are in Owen. He is involved in his church and has worked about every job imaginable from farming to hauling to former president of the historical society.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Local history haunted by ghost stories

    “My Daddy said when he was a young man he was riding horseback one night when this great light came on and followed him as his horse galloped homeward. As the horse and rider passed the Greenup cemetery, the great light suddenly disappeared.”

    Owen County ghosts, goblins and ghouls were  featured in the 1966 Owen County Historical Almanac.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Memories are building blocks of history

    “We could never have loved the earth so well if we had had no childhood in it.”

    These words of George Eliot emphasize the splendor of the world viewed through the eyes of children. It is a place of miracles and magic, an enchanted kingdom where colors are more brilliant, the air softer, the love of family and friends more precious and the unfolding of each new day more awe inspiring.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Join the Professional Porch Sitters Union

    They came in all shapes and sizes, and their place of importance in the lives of Owen countians and their communities can never be underestimated.

  • Owen Historical Society News: River’s role in history honored

    “The American backwoodsman - clad in his hunting shirt, the product of his domestic industry and fighting for the country he loves, he is more than a match for the vile but splendid mercenary of a European despot.”

    These words of William Henry Harrison reflected his high regard for the Kentucky troops during the War of 1812. Harrison was commander of the Northwest army during this conflict, and Kentuckians led the way in achieving a victory for the young, untested America.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Reelin’ in the years

    When asked why he spent so much time fishing, a Kentucky old-timer answered, “Three-fourths of the Earth’s surface is water, and one-fourth is land. It is quite clear that the good Lord intended us to spend triple the amount of time fishing as mowing grass.”

  • Owen Historical Society News: Ads captured moment in time

    Harry Worsham announced he had the “best barber shop in town,” and he invited folks to give it a try; and G.E. Goode, located in Doty Brothers new garage, guaranteed his vulcanizing to “outwear the balance of tires.”
    Harry and G.E. placed these ads in the July 3, 1919 issue of the News-Herald.
    In this same paper, the entire right half of the front page was devoted to ads, a common practice in the early days of newspaper publication.

  • Owen Historical Society News: River Day success a team effort

    It meanders through the heartland of Kentucky and its history claims heroes such as Daniel Boone, George Rogers Clark, Isaac Shelby, John Harrod and Benjamin Logan. However, most of the time it murmurs stories of the common folk who settled along its banks and who, despite ravaging floods, were inescapably drawn back to the Kentucky’s ancient song.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Minch’s store is living history

    It is a landmark in Owen County. Local history permeates every inch of its surface. For over 160 years, it has gazed upon Seminary Street and collected family stories of those who stopped by to visit. Age does not detract from its character but rather defines it; and it represents more than a century of Owen County cherished traditions.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Minch’s store is living history

    It is a landmark in Owen County. Local history permeates every inch of its surface. For over 160 years, it has gazed upon Seminary Street and collected family stories of those who stopped by to visit. Age does not detract from its character but rather defines it; and it represents more than a century of Owen County cherished traditions.