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Bonnie Strassell - Owen County Historical Society

  • Owen countians always answer country’s call

    It wasn’t until the year 1949 that the United States Air Force became a separate branch of the military. Until then it was known as the Army Air Corps, and it was considered part of the Army.

  • Spring has a special place in Owen history

    In the past, Owen countians have seen some bad winters when snow drifted over fence posts, the Kentucky River froze, long-standing shade trees in front yards had to be cut down because at times the cold and snow prevented a journey to the woods for fuel.
    As February made its exit, folks looked forward to spring, and memories of cold and snow gave way to anticipation of house cleaning (at least for the women), planting crops, incubating chicks, and fishing.

  • Landscape changes forever

    For 80 years it served Owen County — a notable amount of time to service a community. In a matter of a few seconds it was gone, but memories of days when it was a vital part of the Gratz scenery live on in the hearts and minds of local residents

  • Landscape changes forever

    For 80 years it served Owen County — a notable amount of time to service a community. In a matter of a few seconds it was gone, but memories of days when it was a vital part of the Gratz scenery live on in the hearts and minds of local residents

  • Sharing tales of the American Civil War

    Whittling away on a stick, his gravely voice at times dropping to an emotional whisper, James, a 90-year-old Confederate veteran, transported a crowd of 30 back in time to experience the sights, sounds, and smells of the Civil War.

  • Even the young helped make Owen stronger

    When Gary Duvall reminisces about his childhood, one thing is evident: Parents considered hard work essential for children to develop character and to lay the foundation for responsible adulthood.
    Recalling working in tobacco fields when he was only 8, Gary didn’t consider that fact to be unusual, nor did his parents think the work too difficult. That was life in Owen County, and had been so since the first settlers arrived. Everyone, including the very young, contributed to the success of the family unit.

  • Hear the story of the U.S. Civil War from a ‘veteran’

    It’s been called the War of Northern Aggression, the Civil War, the War Between the States, and the War of Rebellion. Perhaps the most poignant name given to this tragic time in our country’s history is the Boys’ War. Boys, some as young as 12 and from all areas of the country — including Owen County — joined the fight. Although they were familiar with firearms and their bodies were hardened by toil, nothing could prepare these young men for the carnage, disease, and devastation wrought by war. Owen countians James Mason, W.E.

  • Cold winters used to bring Owen families together

    Recently the January cold spell broke, and after a couple days of rain, a farm wagon piled high with browned tobacco was seen sashaying behind a tractor on its journey down Hwy. 127. The once “King Crop” of Owen County was on its way to a prospective buyer.

  • Friends come to aid of society

    It’s been eulogized in stories and poetry, and has been characterized as judgment of a stern, uncompromising old man, or soft feathers lightly shaken from a pillowcase. It can be light and airy, crusty or crunchy. It is a delight for children and a barely tolerable event for adults. It can evoke pleasure gliding atop its surface, shooting sprays of sparkled dust, which dissipate into the air; or wreak havoc if the gliding involves damage to a car or injury to a person.

  • Looking back at Owen County in the ’60s

     Although it seems unbelievable, 50 years have passed since the 1960s when a decade of historic events occurred — both in Owen County and across the country — events that affected the lives of all of us, and in doing so, presented opportunities to preserve our history.