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Bonnie Strassell - Owen County Historical Society

  • Owen County Historical Soceity News: Woman finds her great-great-grandfather in dusty closet

    She discovered the old picture in her mother’s closet, but no one seemed to know the identity of the distinguished looking man. It was surmised that he was an Owen countian and the picture had a date of 1867 penciled on the back. Historical society member Christina Rice hung the picture in her home and every time she passed it she would ask, “Who are you?” Knowing he was related to her, Christina was determined to solve the mystery of his identity.

  • Owen County Historical Soceity News: Pink Ridge is one of our lost communities

    Though most Owen countians know someone by the name of Elizabeth or Margaret, many may not realize that at one time these were the names of two communities in the county. While examining old copies of the News-Herald, Doris Riley — a historical society member, historian, and genealogist — discovered Margaret and Elizabeth in the “Community News.” Elizabeth was somewhere around Lusby’s Mill, but Margaret seems to be lost somewhere in the past, her whereabouts unknown.

  • Homemade poles and fishing part of history

    Spring ushers Owen countians outdoors to plow, plant, mow, dig fence posts, and paint and repair fencing and barns. Occasionally, a figure might be seen sporting a fishing pole heading for the nearest body of water. The streams, lakes, and river around Owen County offer countless opportunities for skilled fishermen and women to challenge those wily, wet, water creatures as they are lured from the water to the bank, into a skillet, and then onto a platter to hold a place of honor at the supper table.

  • Part of our history passes away

  • Sharing the music of our heritage

    As his lean, nimble fingers glided effortlessly along the dulcimer strings, Ron Devore coaxed a variety of melodious songs from his instrument. The soft-spoken gentleman, dressed in bibbed overalls, delighted his audience Thursday at the monthly historical society meeting.
    At times, the strings jumped as they danced lively to Bluegrass tunes or Appalachian clogging; then would soften to the wailful love songs of 16th-century England. In either case, there was plenty of toe-tapping, hand-clapping accompaniment from appreciative spectators.

  • Owen’s home for history needs some attention

    Throughout the years, Owen countians have dealt with houses displaying leaky roofs, crumbling porches, and weather-beaten exteriors. Many family homesteads were ravaged by insects, rodents and time; yet from one generation to another, families of Owen County gathered to repair, repaint, and rejoice over the ability to rejuvenate the family home yet once again.

  • Loss of a family member would touch community

    A few weeks ago, family and friends gathered around a historical society member, Joyce Hill Smith Hardin, to mourn the loss of her husband, Scott Hardin. Pictures of Scott were on display, and those images conveyed a celebration of a life filled with unforgettable memories.

  • Share our traditional cuisine at event

    One traditional way that Owen countians have immortalized their families is by collecting, recording, and passing down recipes to their loved ones.
    For most people, food and family are intimately connected, and family recipes are a way of keeping our ancestry, as well as a part of ourselves, alive. Cooking from family recipes can evoke vivid memories of childhood, reminding us of experiences long forgotten and allowing us to relive those feelings of comfort and excitement.

  • Owen County is proud to acknowledge role of our women

    Since the beginning of time, women have played a vital role in the affairs of the world. March is “Women in History” month and we reminisce and celebrate the resilient fortitude and achievements of the women of Owen County.

  • Son shares father’s legacy

    In 1943, Kelly Morrison was hitchhiking, a common practice in the nation at that time. Kelly was returning home after serving over three years in the Air Force during WWII. He was a side gunner on a B-24, also known as the “Liberator,” and had flown 25 missions, had been seriously wounded, and received three medals, including the Purple Heart.