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Bonnie Strassell - Owen County Historical Society

  • Kay's Branch News: Remember the veterans Friday

    I must start off with a correction. It was not Jeannie Williams Baker who went to the dance with Joyce, Cig and Coleman. It was Jeannie Barber Jones. I’m not sure if it was me reading it wrong or Wanda’s mistake. I do have a tendency to anticipate when I read the e-mails late at night. I may have read “Jeannie,” and because the only Jeannie I know is Jeannie Williams, I just typed in her name instead of actually reading the sentence verbatim.

  • Remember the veterans Friday

    I must start off with a correction. It was not Jeannie Williams Baker who went to the dance with Joyce, Cig and Coleman. It was Jeannie Barber Jones. I’m not sure if it was me reading it wrong or Wanda’s mistake. I do have a tendency to anticipate when I read the e-mails late at night. I may have read “Jeannie,” and because the only Jeannie I know is Jeannie Williams, I just typed in her name instead of actually reading the sentence verbatim.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Cemeteries are part of a family’s legacy to the future

    Age does not deter 80-year-old Don Crugger and his 76-year-old brother, Clay, from their dedication to the preservation of the Smith Cemetery in Breck. Breck was always a small community in Owen County, originally comprised  of several homes and a grocery. Today, all that remains of Breck is a couple houses, the Smith Cemetery, and some who are determined to keep alive the history of the people who lived, died and are buried there.

  • Owen County Historical Society News: Those childhood memories are the basis for our history

    Some of the memories we hold most dear are those of our childhood; and those reminiscences of the past are significant pieces of our history to be shared with others.
    Larry Dale Perry and Peggy McDannell Trinkle remember growing up on East Adair Street, better known as “Dog Hill.” No one knows for sure where the area got the name of Dog Hill, but perhaps the numerous dogs wandering about the streets at that time contributed to its fame.

  • Owen County Historical Society News: Fay Shelton continues to share with community

    After Fay Shelton suffered from a bout of rheumatic fever at the age of 5, her mother sold a cow to purchase a piano for her daughter. Thus began a life-long love of music, which included a career as a music teacher in the Owen County School System.

  • Owen County Historical Society News: Music and memories preserved at museum and on display

    One could tell that the river is in his blood, and his love of the Kentucky was reflected in the glint of his eyes and the resonance of his voice as he recalled his life near its banks. Along with many Owen countians, some who also made their homes by the Kentucky River, “Boss” Kemper attended the Owen County Historical Society Museum’s dedication of the Kentucky River Room and calliope.

  • Owen County Historical Society News: History is all about new beginnings

    Owen countians have always experienced new beginnings. The first settlers traveled to the area by way of the Cumberland Gap, literally hacking their way through the dense forests. Some were killed by Indians, others suffered from starvation, cold and disease. Yet their desire for a new beginning and a better life strengthened their resolve.

  • Owen County Historical Society News: Wagons were indispensable

    Wagons have always played an important part in the history of Owen County. After the long hunters made their trek over the Appalachian Mountains and claimed land in Kentucky, they returned home (most often to Carolina or Virginia) and brought their families to this wilderness. The rich, fertile land of Kentucky was considered to be a paradise on earth. According to T.A. Perry, the first entries claiming land in what is now Owen County were filed in the Virginia Land Offices in 1780.

  • Owen County Historical Society News: Wagons were indispensable

    Wagons have always played an important part in the history of Owen County. After the long hunters made their trek over the Appalachian Mountains and claimed land in Kentucky, they returned home (most often to Carolina or Virginia) and brought their families to this wilderness. The rich, fertile land of Kentucky was considered to be a paradise on earth. According to T.A. Perry, the first entries claiming land in what is now Owen County were filed in the Virginia Land Offices in 1780.

  • Owen County Historical Society News: Traditional foods still have a home

    Recipes are pieces of history. They have been written down on small scraps of paper or verbally passed from one generation to another. Early arrivals of Owen County shared recipes with family and friends, and today those same recipes produce a variety of specialties that originated in England, Ireland, Germany, Italy, and Africa.