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Bonnie Strassell - Owen County Historical Society

  • Owen Historical Society News: Armed mob once considered Owen jail break

    “The simplest most important thing you can do for your family may be the simplest of all: develop a strong family narrative.” 

    Author Bruce Feliler attributes family stories as the secret sauce that holds families together.
    Owen County is replete with family and community narratives that have been shared with others. These stories of home life and community events serve to strengthen our ties both with our immediate family and with those with whom we share those stories.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Kenney school still lives in our memories

    “The last time I saw the school its windows were boarded up and the porch was completely gone, but there are many memories of so many people who went through that old school door. I am one of them.”

  • Owen Historical Society News: ‘When I was young’ starts many great tales

    They produce love and laughter, heartache and tears and build a tapestry of personalities that connect and bond together to create families. Each family member reflects the past, present, and future; and family stories etch themselves into memories and nourish souls.
    Preserving family stories presents challenges to modern man.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Early peoples, animals left indelible marks

    The Delaware Indians called them the “Allegewa”and there is evidence of their presence in Owen County long ago. The remains of a stone tower, believed to have been built by these people, is perched atop a steep incline along Severn Creek.
    From its lofty height a great stretch of the Kentucky River along with the adjoining bottom lands can be seen.

  • Owen Historical Society News: History is as plentiful as dirt

    “It’s as cheap as dirt, as plentiful as dirt and as dirty as dirt.”

    This quote reflected the opinion of someone who obviously had occasion to live in an era when bituminous coal was king in Kentucky.
    Though there may be truth in this statement the fact remains that coal played a integral part in the history of the commonwealth, and most Owen countians remember the days when area homes, businesses and schools depended on this smooth sooty sometimes smelly resource for heat.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Owen County is used to freezing weather

    The request came as a surprise to the Dunavents.
    As Christmas drew near the wish list of most Owen county girls their daughter’s age included ice skates, nylons, makeup, and the latest fashions on display at the Blue Front Department Store.
    But for Carlene Dunavent, the one item she most wanted was a nice warm robe to ward off the winter chill that invaded  her upstairs bedroom.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Owen County susceptible to that sinking feeling

    They are unwelcome residents and for hundreds of years they have squatted on Owen County land.
    New ones seemingly appear overnight and their appetites are insatiable. Gaping mouths are fed dirt, rock, lime, trash and an occasional rusty car or pickup, yet to no avail. These indefatigable giants are a constant irritation but from earliest times Owen countians have accepted their presence as part of the local landscape. Most don’t need an introduction to these sometimes cavernous depressions known as Owen County sinkholes.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Remember the winding roads along Caney Creek

    The roads twist and turn and create a maze that at times leaves one wondering if he is coming or going.
    According to Owen County Property Value Administrator Jimmy Coyle, it’s easy to get lost if one is not familiar with the area. Doris Riley can attest to this fact. Three times, she visited a friend who lived in a community along Caney Creek and although she had no trouble finding her way in, all three times she got lost trying to find her way out.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Owen countians marched to freedom’s beat

    “The muffled drum’s sad roll has beat
    The soldier’s last tattoo;
    No more on Life’s parade shall meet
    That brave and fallen few.
    On Fame’s eternal camping-ground
    Their silent tents are spread,
    And Glory guards with solemn round,
    The bivouac of the dead.”

     – Theodore O’Hara’s poem Bivouac of the Dead was composed after the Mexican War to honor the Kentuckians who lost their lives in that conflict.

  • Great care used to comfort families

    He is long and lanky and stands head and shoulders above most everyone else.
    Although he lives in Carroll County, his roots are in Owen. He is involved in his church and has worked about every job imaginable from farming to hauling to former president of the historical society.