.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Bonnie Strassell - Owen County Historical Society

  • Owen Historical Society News: Small communities had a big impact

    Most Owen countians are familiar with the names of Claxon Ridge, Pink Ridge, Stewart Ridge, Buffalo Ridge, Riddle’s Ridge, Divided Ridge, Fortner Ridge, Ball Ridge, Harris Ridge, Bethel Ridge and Long Ridge. Some of these hilltops took on the names of the families who first settled along their crests, while the origin of the names of others may have been lost over the years.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Newspapers reflected a prosperous community

    “To look at the (news) paper is to raise a seashell to one’s ear and to be overwhelmed by the roar of humanity.”

    These words by Swiss author Alain de Botton described the undeniable influence a newspaper has upon its readers.
    Newspapers have been a part of our daily life for centuries. They were not only an avenue of advertisement and of distributing information to the public, but were also a means of providing entertainment through satire or storytelling.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Post offices were hubs of activity for residents

    “Dillender hauled the mail in a covered freight wagon. On the trip to Eagle Station, he carried produce, poultry, animal skins, rabbits (in season) and sundry other farm products to the L & N depot for shipment to Louisville.
    On the return trip, he brought the day’s mail, staple and sundry stock for the stores and huge baskets of fresh bread, stacked in unwrapped loaves, a luxury directly related to Moxley’s close proximity to the railroad.”

  • Owen Historical Society News: From generation to generation, quilts preserve history

    Author Marlene Parkin once wrote: “Quilts are masterpieces of the heart and windows into women’s history. They possess a magic that will never die, for all of life’s hopes and fears, loves and hates have been sewn into them.”
    Quilts are timeless. Crafted from bits and pieces of shirts, coats, overalls and dresses, they serve as palpable memories of the past.
    The origin of quilting is somewhat uncertain although the oldest example of patchwork is an Egyptian queen’s canopy dated around 960 B.C.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Armed mob once considered Owen jail break

    “The simplest most important thing you can do for your family may be the simplest of all: develop a strong family narrative.” 

    Author Bruce Feliler attributes family stories as the secret sauce that holds families together.
    Owen County is replete with family and community narratives that have been shared with others. These stories of home life and community events serve to strengthen our ties both with our immediate family and with those with whom we share those stories.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Kenney school still lives in our memories

    “The last time I saw the school its windows were boarded up and the porch was completely gone, but there are many memories of so many people who went through that old school door. I am one of them.”

  • Owen Historical Society News: ‘When I was young’ starts many great tales

    They produce love and laughter, heartache and tears and build a tapestry of personalities that connect and bond together to create families. Each family member reflects the past, present, and future; and family stories etch themselves into memories and nourish souls.
    Preserving family stories presents challenges to modern man.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Early peoples, animals left indelible marks

    The Delaware Indians called them the “Allegewa”and there is evidence of their presence in Owen County long ago. The remains of a stone tower, believed to have been built by these people, is perched atop a steep incline along Severn Creek.
    From its lofty height a great stretch of the Kentucky River along with the adjoining bottom lands can be seen.

  • Owen Historical Society News: History is as plentiful as dirt

    “It’s as cheap as dirt, as plentiful as dirt and as dirty as dirt.”

    This quote reflected the opinion of someone who obviously had occasion to live in an era when bituminous coal was king in Kentucky.
    Though there may be truth in this statement the fact remains that coal played a integral part in the history of the commonwealth, and most Owen countians remember the days when area homes, businesses and schools depended on this smooth sooty sometimes smelly resource for heat.

  • Owen Historical Society News: Owen County is used to freezing weather

    The request came as a surprise to the Dunavents.
    As Christmas drew near the wish list of most Owen county girls their daughter’s age included ice skates, nylons, makeup, and the latest fashions on display at the Blue Front Department Store.
    But for Carlene Dunavent, the one item she most wanted was a nice warm robe to ward off the winter chill that invaded  her upstairs bedroom.