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Today's News

  • Storytellers, tour helps make history come alive for visitors

    Visitors from across the country received a glimpse into Owen County history Friday during the guided carriage tour.

    Those on the tour had the opportunity to visit the oldest surviving brick home in Owen County, the Owen County Historical Museum, the Owen County Courthouse and the Stafford House. Local storytellers were stationed at each location. A tea was included in the tour, which included soup, sandwiches and desserts.

  • Letter to the Editor: Arts in the Park is a success

    I would like to applaud the Owen County Arts Council for the wonderful “Arts in the Park” fair last Saturday. It was evident that a lot of planning and hard work made the event a success.

    It was an impressive mix of excellent exhibitions, talented musicians, accomplished artists, and skilled craftsmen.

    Thanks guys for making this happen.

    Debra Gash

    Owen County

  • Owen softball players win post-season honors

    The Owen County softball team recently handed out its awards for the 2009 season.  

    Jensen Wainscott and Courtney Waldrop finished the season with the highest batting averages. Both hit .338 on the year.

    Katelyn Sutherland was the Pitching Ace as she finished the season with an earned run average of 2.02.

    The Most Improved Player was Brittany Tuggle.

    Wainscott led the team in stolen bases with 22 while Courtney Waldrop was the RBI leader with 18 runs batted in for the season.  

  • Fair fun on the horizon

    Summer heat, barbecues and booths selling fireworks are all sure signs that summer is here; and with the start of summer comes the anticipation of the 2009 Owen County 4-H Fair and Horse Show.

    This year’s fair will be held July 11-18 at the Owen County Fairgrounds. Fair board member Teresa Roberts is looking forward to a fun-filled week.

    Roberts said last year’s fair was a huge success.

  • Kentucky-American may have tax refund coming

    Owen County may soon be sending some hefty checks to Kentucky-American Water.

    Owen County Judge-Executive Carolyn Keith has been notified that taxing districts in Owen County could be giving money back to the utility after the company apparently overpaid its tax obligation.

  • Letter to the Editor: Another tea party planned for Fourth

    This July 4 will find people from all over Kentucky converging on the steps of the capitol building in Frankfort. A great many of these folks will be coming on buses from such cities as Elizabethtown, Louisville, Somerset and many others. This will be the second “tea party” conducted this year at the capitol building. The first one was held on April 15.

  • Community aims to help special guests enjoy their time in Owen County

    Owen County has often been recognized for its beautiful landscape, its number of skilled craftsmen and a strong sense of community.

    This summer, Owen County will be recognized on a worldwide level when the U.S. Open Sporting Clay Championship takes place at Elk Creek Hunt Club.

    The U.S. Open is the second-largest sporting clay event in the world. More than 1,000 shooters from all over the world are expected to compete in the event, which started Tuesday and goes through Friday.

  • On the trail of history: Book gives insight to quilts

    Throughout the past year, colorful quilt squares have popped up all over on Owen County barns, signs and even one restaurant. Many are curious, but few know the rich history behind the farms and the patterns that adorn the individual barns.

    The Owen County Extension Homemakers have spent many hours researching and preserving the history of various quilt patterns. Their latest effort is a 50-page book containing information about each quilt square in Owen County.

  • Hammond urges public to watch out for salesmen

    Owen County Sheriff Zemer Hammond is warning area residents to be alert and on the lookout for fake salesmen.

    The sheriff’s department received a phone call Saturday from a woman who reported that two men claiming to be linoleum salesmen allegedly entered her Hesler home without permission.

    The woman had gone out to her mailbox when the two pulled into her driveway and told her  they were opening a business in Owenton and had linoleum they were attempting to get rid.

  • Protests change one man’s opinion

    Alright, I will admit it.

    I was wrong.

    A few weeks ago, I wrote a column decrying the uselessness of Twitter, the Internet service that allows people to send short blasts of information to a list of people who sign up to receive them. In most cases, these 140-character blasts are used to carry irrelevant tidbits like “home from work now. going to take a nap” or “wearing my new sneakers and they are GREAT.”