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Today's News

  • Community aims to help special guests enjoy their time in Owen County

    Owen County has often been recognized for its beautiful landscape, its number of skilled craftsmen and a strong sense of community.

    This summer, Owen County will be recognized on a worldwide level when the U.S. Open Sporting Clay Championship takes place at Elk Creek Hunt Club.

    The U.S. Open is the second-largest sporting clay event in the world. More than 1,000 shooters from all over the world are expected to compete in the event, which started Tuesday and goes through Friday.

  • On the trail of history: Book gives insight to quilts

    Throughout the past year, colorful quilt squares have popped up all over on Owen County barns, signs and even one restaurant. Many are curious, but few know the rich history behind the farms and the patterns that adorn the individual barns.

    The Owen County Extension Homemakers have spent many hours researching and preserving the history of various quilt patterns. Their latest effort is a 50-page book containing information about each quilt square in Owen County.

  • Hammond urges public to watch out for salesmen

    Owen County Sheriff Zemer Hammond is warning area residents to be alert and on the lookout for fake salesmen.

    The sheriff’s department received a phone call Saturday from a woman who reported that two men claiming to be linoleum salesmen allegedly entered her Hesler home without permission.

    The woman had gone out to her mailbox when the two pulled into her driveway and told her  they were opening a business in Owenton and had linoleum they were attempting to get rid.

  • Protests change one man’s opinion

    Alright, I will admit it.

    I was wrong.

    A few weeks ago, I wrote a column decrying the uselessness of Twitter, the Internet service that allows people to send short blasts of information to a list of people who sign up to receive them. In most cases, these 140-character blasts are used to carry irrelevant tidbits like “home from work now. going to take a nap” or “wearing my new sneakers and they are GREAT.”

  • Owen County continues to grow - Guest Editorial By Frank Downing

    Owen County may not share the doom and gloom stories that we hear from some areas of our county and really worldwide.

    We should be very thankful here in Owen County with the many projects that are under way or have been recently completed.

  • Open for business

    Tim Hudnall, who has worked in automotive repair for the last 20 years has decided to begin his own business.

    Hudnall, who opened Tim’s Auto Repair last month, made his decision to begin his own business based on the need for a steady income and to provide excellent service at a better price for Owen County citizens.

    “I just wanted to work for myself,” Hudnall said. “I wanted to get money for myself instead of someone else and I think working for yourself is a lot less stress.”

  • Teachers are heroes in the real world

    Letter to the Editor:

    I am writing this letter because I am proud of my son, Seth Edmonson, and also our school system. In March I was called to attend a meeting with some of the school staff.

  • Ohio high school tries to return lost class rings

    Purchasing a class ring is often a monumental time in a high school student’s life. Worn as a symbol of pride for achieving goals in high school, it is a keepsake that provides many with remembrance of youthful days gone by.

    Two years ago, a letter was mailed to Owen County High School along with a 1958 OCHS class ring from McAuley High School in Cincinnati, Ohio.

    The letter read, “The enclosed ring was found in our old, old lost and found. Hope you can find the owner.”

  • Roo may still be on the loose

    Angela Perkins’ life has not been an easy one since she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis over two years ago.

     But she said that with the help of a unique miniature kangaroo named Cletus Eugene, she became more at ease with her disability – until Cletus went missing.

    Initially Cletus was to be a pet, but upon learning that he could sense MS attacks Cletus transformed into a service pet.

  • Owen youth take pride while ‘litter-bugs’ don’t

    Letter to the Editor

    On May 16, we had the privilege to help in our county by picking up trash on Greenup Road. We had several of our youth help in the clean-up. They worked very hard and vowed not to ever throw trash out of their cars. It was quite a learning experience for each person who helped. Some questions that were asked were, “Where does all this trash come from?” and “Why do people throw trash out on the side of the road?” It is sad to say, but most of the trash is thrown out by people who do not realize the impact it has on our county.