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Today's News

  • Fair time

    Many changes have taken place with the Owen County Fair this year.

    If you been by the fairgrounds lately, you will see construction going on.

    The fair board received a grant to renovate the existing exhibit building as well as adding a new addition. The new addition will have a kitchen, meeting room, storage area and an office.

    Also, three additional directors were added to the board: Melissa Bourne, Stephanie Howard and Lindsey Tirey.

  • Elk Creek Winery and the final frontier

    For those who say nothing ever happens in Owen County ... I almost knocked down William Shatner at Elk Creek Winery a few weeks ago.

    I was there to have lunch with Benjy Hamm, editorial director for Landmark Community Newspapers, the parent company of the News-Herald.

    We discussed business and, as always, had a great meal at the winery.

    After lunch, we walked around and visited the store.

  • Summer program brings hundreds to library

    There are many days that make me grateful to be a librarian in Owen County, but there are some days that just blow me away. Last Wednesday, June 23, was one of those days.

    Let me give you a little bit of context here. Summer reading programming always creates excitement and makes our library a busy place, and this summer is no exception. 

    Over 330 children and adults are signed up to participate in our programs, and since the beginning of June, over 70 new library cards have been issued. 

  • A fun fair forecast

    Owen countians searching for inexpensive family fun and entertainment don’t have to look very far with the Owen County 4-H Fair and Horse Show only a little more than a week away.

    Fair-goers have much to look forward to this year as a new carnival will provide rides and games, along with the return of motorcross and family fun night, according to Teresa Roberts, one of this year’s fair directors.

  • No. 10 (Male) - Billy Whitney

    Sometimes statistics do not matter.  

    The late 1950s and early 1960s was a time when things were changing in America. Technology was improving, people were moving from the country to the city, and a young man named John F. Kennedy was making a name for himself in politics.

    Something else was changing as well. African-Americans were moving from the back of the bus to the baseball diamond and the basketball court. Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in baseball in 1947 and Red Aurebach drafted the first African-American in the NBA in 1950. 

  • County enlists feds for help

    The flood of 2010 hit several areas of Owen County hard, forcing residents out of their homes and leaving some people wondering if moving back was worth it.

    However, homes weren’t the only things damaged during the flooding, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service will be stepping in to help clean up the mess left behind.

    The Owen County Fiscal Court recently entered into a project agreement with the NRCS to remove debris and help prevent flooding in the future.

    The court held a special-called meeting Friday to discuss the issue.

  • Office will evolve and adopt latest technology

    Today we no longer express our feelings, thoughts, or do daily work at our place of employment on the written page.

    We now tend to communicate in new ways. We have been swallowed up by technology. We e-mail, copy on disc, text abbreviated messages, or talk on the cell phones. In these paperless times, writing letters, lists, or paper work is nearly a lost art.

    In some circumstances, however, things written down can be more effectively used. I found this to be especially true involving the delinquent tax list for 2009.

  • No. 10 (Female) - Jensen Wainscott

    Her accomplishments are much bigger than she is.

    She began her varsity career as an eighth-grader when she played left field for the Lady Rebels in the spring of 2006. Later that year she enrolled as a freshman at Owen County High School and began a high-school career that included playing golf, basketball and softball.

    About five feet tall, she was often the smallest person on the court or the field, but don’t let her size fool you. Jensen Wainscott gave everything she had while playing sports, and in the process enjoyed both individual and team success.

  • Three Rivers sponsors fun runs to promote fitness

    Three Rivers District Health Department/Owen County Health Center hosted the second in a series of four 5K fun run/walk events May 1 at the Owen County High School. 

    Thirty participants braved the strong rains and cool temperatures for the opportunity to run and walk. Everyone gathered at the winner’s circle where trophies were given to the first-, second-, and third-place racers and medals were presented to the top three males and females in seven different age groups.

  • Ancient dance secrets

    For Jamee Jackson, dancing holds many different pleasures – fun, exercise, expression and a sense of self-confidence and beauty.

    After several years of teaching belly dancing throughout northern Kentucky, Jackson is now looking to bring those same pleasures to the women of Owen County.

    Jackson, a resident of Owen County, opened her first belly dancing studio earlier this month after a trip to downtown Owenton, when she noticed a building for rent on Seminary Street.