.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Find another way to help democracy

    Have you considered becoming an election officer in Owen County?

    The election officers are a vital part of having a smooth, fair and accurate election.

    In order to serve as an election officer, you must attend election training sessions; you must also be a qualified registered voter. You can serve as a precinct officer as long as you will be 18 years old on or before the general election.

  • Saints marching back with a trophy

    The New Orleans Saints marched into Miami as the underdog in Super Bowl XLIV. They marched out taking football’s biggest prize with them.

    I must admit, I was rooting for the Colts, but after watching the game on Sunday night how can you not root for the Saints?

    For the last few years, the most memorable images coming out of New Orleans have been ones of devastation and despair. People wondered how long and even if the city would be able to recover.

  • End of an era

    After nearly 25 years of entertaining Owen County, the owners of Croxton’s Video and Tanning are closing the doors due to increased competition and a rough economy.

    Brothers Ronnie and Mark Croxton and mom June Croxton each agreed that it had been a good run.

    “We’re from Henry County but we probably know more people here and have more friends here than we do there,” Ronnie Croxton said. “We’ll probably never see some of them again. That’s the worst part about it.”

  • Medical progress changes girl’s life

    Mary Wilhoite wasn’t expecting doctors to hear a murmur the first time they listened to her unborn child’s heart. She spent the next nine months hoping that her baby girl, Maggie, would be born healthy.

    After Maggie was born, Mary learned that her newborn baby was a victim of a congenital heart defect – pulmonary stenosis

    “I found out when I was pregnant,” Mary Wilhoite said. “The first time the doctors listened to her heart beat they heard a murmur.”

  • Eyesore action

    After recently updating its nuisance ordinance and instating a nuisance-enforcement board, the Owenton City Council is getting down to business and foreclosing on an Owenton house.

    The council met Feb. 2 and voted to take this action on a purple house on East Perry Street.

  • Owen Co. exposure

    Owen countians will get a taste of fame when the spring edition of “Back Home in Kentucky” magazine reaches the mailboxes of thousands across the state.

    “Back Home in Kentucky,” now based in Shelbyville, began in 1977 when two brothers came up with the idea of putting together a positive-news magazine featuring all things Kentucky.

    The magazine was bought in 2000 by its current owners, Bill Matthews of Shelbyville and May Penniston of New Castle.

  • Kay’s Branch News By Bee Spicer

    There isn’t much to report this week. The “Big Storm” came as advertised. We only got about 3 ½ inches on the Branch and that came in the wee hours of Saturday morning and lasted till only about 10:30 a.m.

    The sun came out and it was a beautiful day – if you were inside. When I got up Sunday morning, it was -3 degrees on my thermometer at the front of the house.

  • Up and down week for Lady Rebs

    The past week for the Owen County Lady Rebels was one of contrasts.

    The week began with a trip to South Oldham to play one of the better teams in the 8th region. The week ended with a home game against Williamstown, a team that is not as highly regarded.

    While the Lady Rebels dropped a 49-45 decision to the Lady Dragons, they played better in defeat than they did in a 34-28 win over the Lady Demons.

  • Georgia: On my mind

    The snow finally arrived early this morning. It’s a measly three inches, but it’s better than nothing. I don’t know who is more relieved to see it – me or Bill, the nice weatherman on Channel 18.

  • History ... hot off the press

    The long-anticipated Owen County Family History Book was released Thursday by the Owen County Historical Society. The hardcover book, over 288 pages with hundreds of photos never before seen by the public, covers the history of many prominent Owen County families, churches, clubs and schools.

    Owen County Historical Society President Jeannie Baker said she can wait to start turning the pages.

    “We’ve waited a long time for this,” Baker said. “I am going to curl up somewhere warm and read it straight through.”