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Today's News

  • Owen Co. Farm Bureau brings home honors at annual meeting

    The Owen County Farm Bureau Office was honored with several awards during the state-wide organization's meeting in Louisville.

  • Owen County Property Transfers

    Carolyn C. Rice to Phillip W. Rice, KY 845 and Agee Pike/Road.
    Beatrice Alexander Revocable Living and Beatrice Alexander Revocable Living to Beatrice Alexander, lot 5, Timberwood Lake Shores Subdivision.
    Robert Faulkner Sr. to to Kenneth Allen Faulkner, Eagle Creek Subdivision.
    Timothy Allen Gullion to Alice Emery, Eagle Hill Road, $75,000.
    Mitzi Jayne Meredith to The Mitzi Jayne Meredith Revocable Trust, Mitzi Jayne Meredith Revocable Trust, Mitzi Jayne Meredith Revocable Trust, State Hwy. No. 35.

  • Owen County District Court - Dec. 2, 2011

    Pamela Sawyer, fourth-degree assault, continued to Dec. 16.
    James B. Hill, 1979, non-payment of fines, in jail, owes $122.75, owes restitution, jail credit.
    James B. Hill, 1979, non-payment of fines, in jail, owes $188, owes restitution.
    James Brandon Hill, 1979, non-payment of fines, in jail, owes $292, owes restitution.
    James Brandon Hill, 1979, non-payment of fines, in jail, owes $258, owes restitution.
    James Brandon Hill, 1979, non-payment of fines, in jail, owes $160, owes restitution.

  • The Weekend Gardener: African violets bloom indoors year round

    One of a few sure things in my life is that I can keep my African violets in bloom year round!  Many complain that after the first flush of blooms fades the only thing left is a year’s worth of fuzzy foliage.  Well, with a little attention you can keep your African violet cycling in and out of bloom all year round. African violets are easier to grow then many think if you create a favorable growing environment

  • Williams' goat finds a second home in Texas

  • Kay's Branch News: Red and green are in and orange and brown are out

    I’ve had a very good week, even though my house looks like a Christmas factory has exploded inside of it. I’ve gotten a little bit done in every room but nothing is finished, ergo, the guest bedroom looks like it’s packing to leave for parts unknown.
    The orange and brown has been packed away and the red and green laid out to be hung, arranged or placed strategically on tables, mantle or anything that doesn’t move.

  • Rain sparks flood-safety tips

    By Rick Morgan
    EM director, Owen County Emergency Management Office
    If a flood is likely in your area, you should listen to the radio or television for information. Be aware that flash flooding can occur. If there is any possibility of a flash flood, move immediately to higher ground. Do not wait for instructions to move. Be aware of streams, drainage channels, canyons, and other areas known to flood suddenly.  
    Flash floods can occur in these areas with or without such typical warnings as rain clouds or heavy rain.

  • Leadership group visits Owen Electric

    The Owen County Primary School Leadership Class visited Owen Electric Cooperative Friday to find out more about Owen Electric and what a cooperative is.
    “The class is observing productive businesses or cooperatives that are successful in our community. The students research the business and then visit the business, ask questions, and take notes about what they have learned,” Owen County Primary School Gifted and Talented Coordinator Teena Gamble said

  • County Clerk's Corner: New year brings changes, new options

    Now, as the election is over and the holidays approach, I want to focus on public awareness of the office scheduled closings due to the computer system outages statewide. The office will be closed Dec. 23, 24 and 26 for Christmas holiday and Dec. 30, 31 and Jan 2 for New Year’s holiday.

  • Owen County Historical Society: Community wasn’t immune to ravages of disease

    Even into the 20th century, Owen countians were not immune to the “speckled monster.” 
    It attacked young and old alike, and many did not survive its devastating assault. Through the 18th and 19th centuries, pioneer villages and towns were decimated by its onslaught, and many succumbed to the effects of this dreaded disease called smallpox.
    Owen County records show that in December of 1902 a smallpox epidemic was raging in the area, and many died as it made its way from household to household.