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Today's News

  • Fifth-place finishes for girls track team

    The Owen County High School girls track team competed in a pair of meets last week. They would finish fifth in both the Scott County All-Comers Meet and the NCKC championships.
    On April 30, the team traveled to Georgetown for the Scott County All-Comers Meet.
    In the 100-meter dash, it was Haley DeCandia, 16th; Amber Gover, 22nd;  Andi Burford, 23rd; Nicole Jacobs, 37th; Samantha  Tamplin, 41st; and Helena Kramer, 48th.
    For the 200-meter dash, Gover finished 11th; DeCandia, 16th; Burford, 21st; Paula Rivera, 22nd; and Veronica Chisholm, 28th.

  • Rebels suffer reversal of fortune

    The Owen County High School baseball team is on the wrong kind of roll.
    From April 8 through April 23, the Rebels didn’t lose a game and won nine-straight contests.
    Since then, they have dropped eight in a row.
    Last week began with a trip to Walton-Verona to take on the Bearcats.
    Despite scoring seven runs, Owen County still lost 13-7.
    The seven runs are the most the team has scored and still lost during the current streak.

  • Gray named future star

    David Gray, son of Eric and Jenna Gray of Wheatley, was recently selected for the 2013 seventh-grade offensive line of the Kentucky Future Stars team. He will report to Lindsay Wilson College in June for a week of training and practice. The Kentucky vs. Tennessee game will be held in Knoxville, Tenn. on June 15.  David Gray is the first seventh-grader from Owen County to be selected for this team, following in the footsteps of Michael Wash, who was selected and played on the eighth-grade Kentucky Future Stars team in 2011.

  • Owen County princesses meet royalty

  • Community seeks cure for drug epidemic

    Charlotte Wethington wants to spare Owen County families the suffering she has endured.
    “I was uninformed and then misinformed and that was a deadly combination for my son,” Wethington told a group of 180 concerned citizens at Thursday’s drug forum, hosted by the Owen County Community Health Collaborative.
    Wethington lost her son Casey to a heroin overdose over 10 years ago, but had she not been steered away from intervening, she feels Casey could still be here today.

  • KABOOM leads to two arrests

    Owenton Police Officer Steve Miller didn’t quite know what was going on when he heard the first KABOOM.
    At about 6 p.m. on April 23, Miller was in the parking lot of Save-A-Lot when he heard the boom and debris began to rain down on his cruiser.
    “When I got out to investigate, another explosion occurred,” Miller said in his report. “I called for another officer to assist and did not know what I was dealing with.”
    Miller began to investigate and found pieces of two-liter soda bottles around the parking lot.

  • Dolly’s offers vacation for furry friends

    If you have to leave a family member behind when you go on a cruise, business trip or vacation, an Owen County business wants you to rest and relax knowing that your pet is in good hands.
    Patty Whobrey, owner of Dolly’s Doggie Den, a boarding service for dogs and cats in Owen County, said business has been strong with plenty of repeat customers.
    “Spring break is one of our busiest times,” Whobrey said. “We had 16 pets the first week of April.”

  • Second annual 227 Yard Sale this weekend

    Owen County Magistrate Teresa Davis hopes to show off the end of the county she’s proud to call home while bringing the community together with the second annual 227 Yard Sale this weekend.
    The yard sale will once again be Kentucky Derby themed, but Davis said decorations won’t be mandatory.
    “Everybody does the 127 yard sale,” Davis said. “But because (Hwy.) 227 is out this direction, it gets left out. I just wanted to do something that the whole community could be involved in.”

  • Molly Haines: A member of the family exits the stage

  • Owen Historical Society News – Riddle added to rich history of Owen County

    Someone once said, “God pours life into death and death into life without a drop being spilled.”
    In rural Owen County, the loss of a loved one is accepted as part of everyday life.
    Author and storyteller Charlotte Ann Kemper Atchison described the days of mourning experienced by early Owen County families.
    Charlotte grew up on Bucks Run and wrote of the times in her childhood when a deceased family member was washed and dressed in his or her finest, and placed in the parlor for viewing.