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Today's News

  • I don't believe it!

    When the NCAA Tournament began three weeks ago, one question kept coming up. Who would be this year’s Butler? The answer to that question is unbelievable.
    This year’s Butler is actually Butler.
    The Bulldogs made it to the Final Four for the second year in a row. Butler will now have the chance to get back to the title game where they almost pulled off the biggest upset in tournament history a year ago.

  • Share our traditional cuisine at event

    One traditional way that Owen countians have immortalized their families is by collecting, recording, and passing down recipes to their loved ones.
    For most people, food and family are intimately connected, and family recipes are a way of keeping our ancestry, as well as a part of ourselves, alive. Cooking from family recipes can evoke vivid memories of childhood, reminding us of experiences long forgotten and allowing us to relive those feelings of comfort and excitement.

  • Hunting down a dream

    Pat Pearce spent 20 years of her life fox hunting in Metamora, Mich., but she said that these days she’s content welcoming guests to her newly-opened Ragtime Bed and Breakfast in Owen County.
    It was fox hunting that brought Pearce, 55, to Owen County 10 years ago — when her fox hunting club, the Metamora Hunt, had a joint meet with the Camargo Hunt, which rides in northern and central Kentucky.
    Pearce said her late husband, Dick, became interested in the farm on Breck Road during the meet.

  • Duvall becomes latest Owen educator to be honored

    Kim Duvall, a lifetime resident of Owen County, was recognized at a state technology conference recently for her work with education technology.
    Duvall joins Naomi Cornette, CIO for Owen County Schools, in being recognized for her outstanding work in education technology.
    Duvall received the “Making IT Happen” Award, an internationally recognized awards program for educators and leaders in the field of educational technology integration in K–12 schools.

  • A survivor’s tail

    Back in August 2007, the future for dogs like Biggie didn’t look bright.
    There was no animal shelter in Owen County and the euthanasia rate was high. Several dogs died yearly due to contagious illnesses such as parvo and coccidia. 
     The Owen County Friends of Animals worked diligently to find rescues, fosters or adopters for the dogs taken into the county’s custody.
    When Karen Powell agreed to foster two tiny puppies that were in dire need, she had little idea what would be in store for the animals or herself.

  • County employees will begin carrying identification badges

    Owen County employees will soon receive identification badges to help citizens of the county become better acquainted with officials.
    Owen County is one of the last counties in the state that doesn’t issue badges, Owen County Judge-executive Carolyn Keith said.
    Keith said she mainly wanted the badges for road department and ambulance service employees, as well as the dog warden and jailer.

  • Over a dozen cattle die in truck accident

    By Charlie Pearl and Molly Haines
    Kentucky News Content Service, News-Herald staff
    About 15 cattle died and 75 were rescued in a double-decker tractor-trailer accident on U.S. 127 North in Franklin County near the Peaks Mill Road intersection Wednesday night.
    The driver, David Evans, 48, of Burnside, sustained minor injuries but refused medical treatment, said Franklin County Sheriff Pat Melton.
    “He had some minor scrapes and bruises,” Melton said.

  • County lags nation, state in physical activity

    Adults in Owen County get less exercise in their leisure time than adults nationwide or statewide, putting them at greater risk for obesity and related problems such as diabetes.
    Surveys done by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2006 through 2008 estimate that 31 percent of Owen County adults got no exercise in the previous month, other than what they may have gotten while at work.

  • Owen County is proud to acknowledge role of our women

    Since the beginning of time, women have played a vital role in the affairs of the world. March is “Women in History” month and we reminisce and celebrate the resilient fortitude and achievements of the women of Owen County.

  • Technology continues to change county clerk’s office

    The routine world of regulations, laws, and practices, accompanied by legislation, court decisions and  agreements’ have led to changes in the Owen County Clerk’s Office.