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Today's News

  • The long Georgia line continues

    Boing.
    Boing.
    Boing.
    “What’s that sound?” Ernie bolted up in bed and fumbled for the alarm clock.
    “What time is it?” I mumbled, trying to figure out where I was. I was pretty sure I wasn’t home. Maybe in a hotel room?
    Oh no, could it be a tornado warning? Somewhere, against windows or maybe the roof, I could hear rain falling in torrents.

  • Sharing the music of our heritage

    As his lean, nimble fingers glided effortlessly along the dulcimer strings, Ron Devore coaxed a variety of melodious songs from his instrument. The soft-spoken gentleman, dressed in bibbed overalls, delighted his audience Thursday at the monthly historical society meeting.
    At times, the strings jumped as they danced lively to Bluegrass tunes or Appalachian clogging; then would soften to the wailful love songs of 16th-century England. In either case, there was plenty of toe-tapping, hand-clapping accompaniment from appreciative spectators.

  • Students fight to save the prom in ‘Promedy’

    Owen County High School seniors will present this year’s senior play, “Promedy,” at 8 p.m. April 22, 23, 29 and 30 in the OCHS auditorium.

  • Keith proclaims child abuse prevention month

    Owen County Judge-executive Carolyn H. Keith recently signed a proclamation declaring April as Child Abuse Prevention Month during a brief ceremony. She was joined by Kevin Richardson, the regional advancement director for northern Kentucky of Sunrise Children’s Services, a nonprofit agency that has served abused and neglected children across Kentucky since 1869.

  • Heart problem may have led to accident

    A Jonesville man died April 15 after an apparent cardiac-related episode is believed to have caused him to wreck the vehicle he was driving.
    Kentucky State Police Post Five Public Affairs Officer Michael B. Webb said despite running off the road, over an embankment and into a wooded area, the cause of death came from the cardiac condition.
    Webb said Charlie Webster, 70, of Jonesville was wearing a seat belt at the time of the accident, which happened at the 2000 block of Ky. 36/Jonesville Road.
    State police received the call at 10:12 p.m.

  • County urges landowners to check new flood maps

    Following the addition of new areas to the county’s flood plain maps, Owen County Judge-executive Carolyn Keith and Emergency Management Director Rick Morgan are encouraging those who could be affected to see where their property stands.
    The Owen County Fiscal Court approved a second reading of a flood-damage prevention ordinance during its April 12 meeting.
    Morgan said FEMA has updated maps throughout Kentucky, but Owen County was one of the last to see updates.

  • Board members balk at some staffing changes

    An Owen County Elementary School media specialist position will stay intact following Monday’s Owen County Board of Education meeting.
    The board discussed budget considerations for the 2012 fiscal year and voted to keep the media specialist position at the elementary school, despite a recommendation from Owen County Superintendent David Raleigh to eliminate the position.
    A group of district leaders, which included all the principals, worked on a list of reductions for the 2012 budget.
    Raleigh said the group began working in October.

  • Shutdown serves no purpose

    For weeks, the threat of a federal government shutdown has been hanging over the heads of Americans.
    With the Democrats demanding deep cuts in the federal budget, the Republicans demanding deep, deep cuts in the federal budget and the Tea Party demanding deep, deep, deep, deep cuts in federal spending, it looked like we were going to have some fairly significant cuts in federal spending.
    So it looks like we are all pretty much in agreement that cuts in spending should happen.

  • Owen’s home for history needs some attention

    Throughout the years, Owen countians have dealt with houses displaying leaky roofs, crumbling porches, and weather-beaten exteriors. Many family homesteads were ravaged by insects, rodents and time; yet from one generation to another, families of Owen County gathered to repair, repaint, and rejoice over the ability to rejuvenate the family home yet once again.

  • Be mindful of your mulching

    Every year I write about mulch but no ones seems to care. Mounds of mulch still choke the trunks of trees everywhere you look this time of the year. Trees in landscapes look like telephone poles sticking out of soon-to-be-crusted-over black mulch. How’s that for a foreboding tale. Here’s the message, too much mulch is a bad thing. I know, some people have been liberated but we still have some more work to do. The bottom line: 2 inches of coarse mulch that is not piled around the trunk of the tree or shrub is the desired goal.