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Today's News

  • Youth Services Center offering School Pantry

    Owen County Schools and the Youth Services Center, in conjunction with the Free Store Food Bank School Pantry, is offering a School Pantry.  
    The School Pantry was developed to provide nutritious, healthy food to children and their families for preparation and consumption at their place of residence. Participation requirements include that at least one student living in the household must be enrolled in either the Maurice Bowling Middle School or the Owen County High School.

  • WMU fall quarterly meeting set for Oct. 21

    The Owen County WMU fall quarterly meeting will be held at 10 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 21, at Epoch. All are welcome to come and enjoy the time together and the delicious brunch. Jennifer Gravitt will do the theme interpretation and Watchword. Mandy Holbert will bless us with her beautiful voice.

  • Rebels take down Panthers at home

    By Eli Baker
    Special to the News-Herald

  • Cross country teams compete in annual Lexington Catholic Invitational

    The 40th Annual Lexington Catholic Invitational was held Saturday at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington. Freshman Allison Bourne and Junior Colton Stedam received medals for their efforts.
    Bourne completed the state meet course in 21:13, placing 18th in the field of 183 competitors. Eighth-grader Destiny Goodrich placed 34th, missing a medal by only four spots. Stedam narrowly set a new record of 17:50.48 and placed 28th of the 235 runners. Westley Johnson had his best time of the season. Seventh-graders Eli Rice and Bryce Thornton and sophomore Kailey Cram set new PRs.

  • Wireworms in the potato patch

    I have loads of potatoes this year, most of them are clean as a whistle. We get them out early, so they are ready to harvest by mid to late August. This early start seems to offset any significant problem with wireworms. The tell-tale sign of wireworms: If you do have lots of tiny holes in your potatoes you likely saw the tough little yellow or rust-colored worms when you were digging your crop. In the past few weeks as folks begin to dig their potatoes I hear the inquiry, “What are the tiny holes in my potatoes and how do I prevent them?”  

  • Livestock Market Report | October 11, 2017

    Oct. 4, 2017

    Cattle Receipts: 701
    Sept. 27: 411
    Last Year: 390

    Compared to last week: Feeder steers sold $2-$3 higher, some #3 and #4 weights sharply higher. Heifers sold steady to $2 lower, slaughter cows and bulls steady.

    Feeders: 632
    Slaughter: 56
    Replacements: 13

  • Redneck knows how to start a fire but not a flood

    By Roger Alford

  • ‘Our relationship with God is not a matter of reward, but of love’

    Lately, I’ve been pondering the story Jesus told of the lost son, or what’s more commonly called the parable of the prodigal son.
    The son demands his inheritance from his father, which is basically him telling his dad he wishes him dead, and then takes the money and runs far away, squandering his wealth on wild living.
    When he ends up broke, he finds a job feeding pigs and finds himself so hungry that he longs to eat the pig food.

  • Church News | October 11, 2017

    Monterey Baptist Church

  • Winding roads from the past still remembered by some

    Many early roads that snaked through the hills and hollows of Kentucky have been lost to history, their names and locations forever erased from the memory of man. Most were named after a settler who held a patent on land through which the road ran. However, remnants of the some of these roads exist, and their stories linger in local folklore.
    Road names were known to change over time, perhaps when the pronunciation of a road wasn’t clearly understood. Such seems the case with Kay’s Branch Road.