.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • A special night

    Every Friday night in the fall is special.

    There is a chill in the air that is full of the aroma of hotdogs and popcorn. The lights at the stadium are turned on. The student body is pumped up. The band plays the fight song as the cheerleaders cheer. The team takes the field.

    It is another Friday night full of high school football. While each game is exciting and anticipated, one night stands out above the rest, Homecoming.

  • Police arrest 10 for DUI

    The message on Saturday night was clear: drink and drive and you will get caught.

    Law enforcement stopped 10 people for driving under the influence of alcohol and several others for alcohol intoxication.

    A road block was set up at the intersection of Hwy. 227 and Hwy. 22 for a short time after the Sara Evans concert at Elk Creek Vineyards ended. Owenton Police Chief Terry Gentry said they continued to have heavy patrols throughout the evening.

    “We knew that there would be impaired driving,” he said.

  • Message from the magistrates

    To the people of Owen County,

    With the embarrassing state of affairs our county is facing, we the Owen County Magistrates would like to address a few things so everyone knows in what order we found them out.

    July 28, 2008 – The judge informed us that three problems were found in the 2006/07 audit

    July 29, 2008 – We requested payroll reports at all fiscal court meetings.

  • Voting goes hi-tech

    New voting machines combine hi-tech accuracy and reliability with low-tech simplicity.

    Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson said the new E-scan machines were purchased with federal and state grant funds. Grayson met with County Clerk Joan Kincaid on Monday to introduce the new machines.

    He said the E-scan will replace the old machines which were costly to repair and were no longer available.

    Kincaid said the county has 14 machines, one for each precinct and one for absentee ballots.

  • Court News

    Circuit Court

    Sept. 23, 2008

    Michael Asher, 1988, second-degree complicity criminal possession of a forged insturment, first-degree possession of heroin, use or possession of drug paraphernalia, continued to Oct. 7.

    Ronnie Carmack, 1955, show cause deferred, continued to Oct. 31.

    Randy A. Collins, 1963, shock probation in felony convictions, motion denied.

    David Cook, 1950, trafficking in marijuana, possession of marijuana, use or possession of drug paraphernalia, jury trial set for Nov. 20.

  • Be supermarket savvy

    Unit Pricing

  • Local group hopes to make hiking history

    It’s a dream three years in the making that Camp Kysoc director Jim Ebert hopes will come true the week of Oct. 6.

    Early that morning, a group of Carroll County residents led by Ebert will hit the road for Arizona and the Grand Canyon. The mission: To help Sarah Service become the first paraplegic to descend to the bottom of the canyon on the seven-mile South Kaibab Trail.

    Service, who lives in Owen County, is a Carroll County High School graduate who was left paralyzed from the waist down in a July 2003 car accident.

  • Report reveals a government in trouble

    On Sept. 23, the Owen County grand jury indicted Judge-Executive Billy O’Banion, former Deputy Judge-Executive Renaee Gaines and Treasurer Gayla Lewis with criminal charges. The charges were centered around theft and mismanagement of county funds.

  • A Political prediction

    Iraq will take a back seat to the economy, while promises of “political change” will ultimately drive Kentucky voters this November. That’s according to a sampling of elected leaders and political professors across the state, who expect the outcomes of this year’s 2008 general election to be revealing – if not that surprising – in Kentucky.

    Pollsters and political analysts predict the state will again be “red” this November.

  • Judge should step down

    The 9-25-2008 edition of the Cincinnati Enquirer quotes Judge-Executive O’Banion’s lawyer as saying “”O’Banion will continue working as judge” and “we intend for him to maintain office” in response to charges that O’Banion stole more than $6,000.00 cash and over $600.00 in services from Owen County. The legal system in the United States operates on the concept of ‘innocent until proven guilty’.