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Local News

  • KSP searching for suspects in Cull Family break-in

    No arrests have been made following a break-in at Owenton’s Cull Family Pharmacy during the early morning hours Saturday.
    Kentucky State Police received an alert from the pharmacy’s alarm system at 4:30 a.m.
    “It appears that two individuals broke out the glass in the front of Cull Family Pharmacy to gain entry to the building,” KSP Post 5 Public Information Officer Joshua Lawson said. “An unknown number of pills were taken from the pharmacy.”

  • Popular fishing spot on the rise following repairs to dam

    Following a successful shad eradication and repairs to a leak in Elmer Davis Lake dam, fishing anglers are now beginning to take advantage of the lake’s rising waters.
    Water levels at the lake were significantly dropped following the shad eradication to repair the leak in the dam, according to Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Biologist Jeff Crosby.
    Now that the repairs are complete, Crosby said water levels are on their way back to normal.

  • Making a rock star: OCHS grad., musician returns from first statewide tour

    When I grow up, I want to be a rockstar.
    Patrick Brumback actually wanted to work at Disney’s Pixar when he was growing up, but as it turns out, being a rockstar isn’t too far out of his reach.
    He grew up in Owen County around a family that played music, which fostered a later interest to be a musician.
    “One of my earliest memories is me slapping the strings of my uncle’s electric guitar. I was just making ugly noise but looking back it makes sense,” Brumback said.

  • A fond farewell: Cook follows calling to serve military families

    They say that if you find a job you love, you’ll never work a day in your life. They also say choose a major you love and you’ll never work a day in your life because that field probably isn’t hiring.
    Well, I don’t know who “they” are, but I say, follow the calling of God and you’ll always know you’re where you’re supposed to be exactly when you’re supposed to be there.

  • Itron closing inspires world civ. project

    In any classroom, you’ve heard it 100 times — “When am I ever going to use this?”
    World Civilization students at Owen County High School will be able to answer just that through a new economic project inspired by the closing of Itron’s Owenton facility.
    World Civilizations teacher Jenny Urie has been working for months to put her training in project-based learning to use for students and was inspired by reading of the Itron closing.

  • Thomas pleads not guilty in alleged shooting

    Derrick Mays Thomas, the alleged shooting suspect in a February incident on Old Columbus Road, pleaded not guilty in Owen County Circuit Court April 18.
    Thomas, 23, allegedly shot his girlfriend’s father and sister in an altercation that took place at 2060 Old Columbus Rd., Feb. 17.
    The altercation began after Thomas contacted Elizabeth Neal, 22, about picking up their two daughters, ages 1 and 3.

  • ‘Miss Susan’ brings prestigious award back to Owen County

    Thursday morning, Owen County Public Librarian Susan Hampton walked into work and found a jar of pickles on her desk. To the rest of the community, a jar of pickles may seem like just a sweet present from a friend’s garden, but to the library community, the gift symbolized a prestigious award.

  • A taste of the college experience: Rising seniors heading for Governor’s Scholars Program

    Two Owen County High School rising seniors will get a taste of college life this summer as they attend one of the most prestigious student programs in the state.
    Emma Ashcraft, 16, and Madelin Shelton, 17, have spent much of their high school careers prepping in hopes of attending the Kentucky Governor’s Scholars Program. Their hard work and dedication paid off, and the two will each spend five weeks studying at one of the program’s three locations.

  • Few changes for Owen during Roaring ‘20s

    The 1920s heralded an era of social and political changes in our country. For the first time since the formation of America more people lived in cities than on farms. Radios and home appliances were frequent additions to households, and Henry Ford’s Model T, priced at $260 in 1924, made travel more convenient.
    In 1925, Sears Roebuck opened its first store in Chicago and penicillin was discovered in 1928.
    To the dismay of many, American culture also changed in the Roaring ‘20s and was considered to take on a new urban and less moral direction.

  • Owen Circuit Court

    April 18, 2017

    Johnpatrick Garilao Ada, 1991, first-degree complicity possession of a controlled substance, heroin, three years, waive fines.
    Justin W. Aylor, 1989, first-degree possession of a controlled substance, trafficking in marijuana, drug paraphernalia, operating a motor vehicle under the influence of drugs or alcohol, no tail lamps, no brake lights, failure to notify address change to department of transportation, trial set for Aug. 17.