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Local News

  • Fire destroys one of the oldest homes in county

    Fire claimed a home belonging to Monterey Mayor Dennis Atha.

    Some people say the home had the distinction as being one of the oldest – if not the oldest – homes in Owen County.

    Firefighters said the blaze began early Saturday morning and was still smoking late into the evening. Firefighters stayed at the site Saturday and most of Sunday to make sure the blaze didn’t reignite.

    Bee Spicer, columnist for the News-Herald, told firefighters her family once lived in the home, and it was the oldest in the county and once served as a trading post.

  • Businessman leaves legacy for community

    Owen County has lost one of its most recognizable citizens.

    James Edgar “Ed” Ashcraft, originally from Covington, passed away Saturday after a long battle with cancer.

    Ashcraft was the former publisher and owner of The News-Herald, a retired horse trainer and owner of Ashcraft Realty.

    Ashcraft was extremely involved with Owen County in many different aspects.

    Ashcraft’s son, John Ashcraft, said his father will be remembered for his commitment to the community.

  • Owen County grand jury indictments

    Aug. 11, 2009

    On Aug. 11, 2009, the Owen County grand jury met and returned the following indictments:

    • Lafe. A. Humble, 44, on the charges of possession of a handgun by a convicted felon, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of marijuana.

  • Owen Co. property taxes rise

    The Owen County Fiscal Court voted to raise the property tax rate from 11.7 to 11.8.

    The 11.8 tax rate means a property owner will pay 11.8 cents for every $100 of a property’s value.

    Owen County PVA Jimmy Coyle said the rate had gone up due to a reduction in new construction. “There just isn’t as much new building going on,” Coyle said. “There’s not as many property sales either, but I’d say the bulk of it is the fact that people are not building new homes.”

  • Agricultural board taking applications for programs

    The Owen County Agricultural Development (Phase I) Board will begin taking applications for the County Agricultural Investment Program, beginning Aug. 19. Applications will not be available until this date. They may be picked up at the Owen County Extension Office. Deadline for applications will be Sept. 11.

    The CAIP program offers farmers the opportunity for 50-percent cost share with a maximum of $5,000 in the following areas:

  • Treasure hunters invade Owen

    Despite the threat of rain, bargain hunters came out strong for the world’s longest yard sale.

    The event, also known as the Highway 127 Yard Sale or the 127 Corridor Sale, is a 654-mile event that runs from West Unity, Ohio, to Gadsden, Ala.

    The annual yard sale began in 1987 and took place this year Aug. 6-9.

    Kathy Wainscott, a local vendor who set up shop in front of Hudnall’s Garage, said despite the rain on Thursday, followed by the heat, business was booming.

  • Staying downtown

    The Owen County Sheriff’s Office will be staying put after all.

    After several weeks of debate, the Owen County Fiscal Court rejected a proposal that would temporarily move the department to a rented building on U.S. 22E.

    The plan to move the department was sparked by concerns of employees’ health. It was reported that several staff members had suffered from upper-respiratory problems.

  • Owen Property Transfers

    Steven W. and Karen M. Aulbach to Brian Haddox, Edwin R. Haddox and Elaina Haddox, lot 14, Roberts Farm Land Division, $47,500.

    Rondell H. and Sheila Baker to Brandon Baker, lot 16, Hide-A-Way Hills Subdivison, $60,000.

    James W. and Donna Raye Dunavent to Jill Dunavent, lot 10, Sunset Drive, A.E. Rose Subdivision, $120,000.

    James W. and Virginia F. Beckham to Louella Bibb.

    Leonard K. and Linda L. Nave to Stephen and Teresa Wood, lot 37, Riverlake Subdivision, $14,000.

  • Owen County TAPP recognized with state award

    To a standing ovation from substance abuse and addiction treatment specialists across the state, the Owen County Teen Alcohol Prevention Project Youth Task Force was honored July 21 with the Robert Straus Award for outstanding contributions for substance abuse prevention and treatment practices in Kentucky.

    “Ladies and gentlemen, these are your future colleagues,” said Donna Hillman, state director of the Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities, under which prevention efforts in the Commonwealth of Kentucky fall.

  • Cleaning out the attic

    Cleanup has begun on the Owen County Sheriff’s Office.

    On  Aug. 3, the Owen County Fiscal Court voted to keep the sheriff’s office at its current location. Since then, the company chosen to do the cleanup – Goderwis Construction Inc. – has started making headway.

    Owen County Judge-Executive Carolyn Keith said the cleanup started Aug. 5 with the removal of old documents that took up a large amount of space on the second floor.