.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Feds seek census workers for Owen

    Every 10 years, the government asks us to stand and be counted.

    The census is much more than a head count, it gives our country an opportunity to say who we are and ensure our voice is heard.

    Diane Reed, U.S. Census recruiter for Owen County, said our government is organized according to population. The count will affect everything from the number of representatives in Congress to deciding how the federal government will distribute $300 billion in funds to all the local, state and tribal governments.

  • Graham organization files lawsuit in Owen

    Attorneys working on behalf of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association are suing the estate of a former Owen County resident.

    When Owen County resident Corrine K. Jones passed away, in her will, she directed part of her estate would go to help fund work of the Billy Graham ministries.

    Former Owen County resident Glenn Works was appointed executor of the Jones’ estate and directed to oversee the disbursement of the estate.

    According to the suit brought by BGEA, Works was supposed to be paid $16,950 for his efforts.

  • Autopsy fails to discover cause of Brown’s death

    An autopsy has failed to reveal the cause of death of a former Owen County resident whose remains were found in the trunk of her brother’s car earlier this year.

    Georgetown Police and the Scott County Coroner’s Office feared that because of the condition of Penny Brown’s body, it would be impossible to determine an exact cause of death.

  • Wood stove triggers fire

    As the county prepares for a cold winter season, many homes are starting up their wood stoves for warmth. Fire can keep us warm, but it can also be very dangerous.

    John Spicer experienced the danger of wood stoves firsthand when the chimney at his mother’s home caught fire. He said something must have ignited inside the chimney. He didn’t see any flames but saw lots of smoke pouring out of the chimney.

    “Hearing the fire in the chimney was like being at the bottom of a collapsing coal mine,” he said.

  • Artifacts returns to Monterey

    After three years of planing and dreaming, Artifacts is returning to Monterey.

    Julie Egel and Larry Qubeck opened their store at a new location across the highway from the Monterey Market.

    Egel said they love to travel and would bring crafts back from their travels. They wanted to start a store where they could sell their finds. The store will also feature hand-made brooms, pottery, clothing and artwork. In the summer they will sell organic produce.

    “I love to garden, and I love high quality produce,” Egel said.

  • Giving Thanks: Community celebrates Thanksgiving

    This week will be filled with food, family and football. The smell of roasted turkey will infiltrate our homes as families gather around the dinner table to give thanks.

    Monterey Baptist Church celebrated early with a community Thanksgiving meal Saturday. Pastor Tony Watkins said the church has the dinner every year. He said these holiday dinners have become incredibly successful. They had so many people attend their Halloween party that they ran out of food.

  • Plans move along for middle school

    The Owen County School Board met Monday and received a report from Ron Murrel, the architect responsible for the new middle school. He reported the plans for the school are continuing without problems, and he is finalizing the plans for the exterior of the school. They will also be deciding the materials and colors for the exterior walls.

    The board also received the results of the 2008 audit. Bernadette Smith, CPA with the Charles T. Mitchell Co., said the audit went smoothly and they did not find any problems.

  • BUSTED

    Nov. 13 was a day for the history books.

    After months of investigation, 68 arrest warrants were issued against suspected drug traffickers in five counties, including 16 in Owen County.

    Chip Perry, public affairs officer for the Kentucky State Police Post Five, said this is the largest drug roundup ever for the post.

    He said there are 112 charges pending and all but four charges are felonies.

    The monumental effort started at 5:30 a.m. Thursday and involved every branch of local law enforcement.

  • Auditor meets with fiscal court members

    The investigation phase of the 2008 audit for the Owen County Fiscal Court is complete. The results were presented at an exit conference Nov. 11.

    Greg Giesler, the administrative branch manager and open records administrator with the state auditor’s office, said the exit conference was complete, but the final results will not be released for several months.

  • Nov. 14, 2008

    Bryan A. Ruth, trafficking in marijuana, pleaded not guilty, adopted plea agreement, continued to Dec. 12.

    Steven S. Small, 1986, two counts of trafficking in marijuana, $5,000 cash bond set.

    Michael J. Walker, 1988, three counts of trafficking in marijuana, pleaded not guilty, adopted plea agreement, continued to Dec. 12.

    Matthew Shane Walker, 1986, trafficking in marijuana, pleaded not guilty, continued to Dec. 12.