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Local News

  • Sweet Owen Day set for Saturday

    After rain canceled much of last year’s festivities, Sweet Owen Day organizers are hopeful this year’s event will be better than ever.
    Activities kick off at 7 a.m. Saturday with the annual Owenton Rotary Club pancake breakfast, followed by the 5K run-walk at 8 a.m.

  • 11 overdose calls, 13 days

    Officials believe a batch of heroin that led to 174 overdoses over the course of six days in Cincinnati could be the same batch responsible for a spike in local overdoses.

  • Students look to honor forgotten war hero

    A quick Google search of Owen County native Willis A. Lee turns up pages of results on the Olympic medalist turned war hero. But in Owen County, Lee’s legacy is largely forgotten – a reality the Maurice Bowling Middle School seventh-grade class look to rectify.
    The July 31 edition of the Lexington Herald-Leader carried an above the fold story on Lee, born in the Natlee community and raised on Roland Avenue in Owenton.

  • Sheriff wakes up to yard littered with beer cans

    Owen County Sheriff Mark Bess is among the residents of approximately 10 homes who woke up to a yard littered with empty beer cans Sunday morning.
    Bess said each of the residents had vote ‘no’ signs in their yard for the Sept. 20 countywide wet-dry election.
    “I don’t know who’s behind it,” Bess said. “It’s kind of juvenile, kind of immature and in bad taste.”

  • Show business is Stewart's business

    On a hot Friday morning in Pleasant Home, Gene Ray Stewart chats about his formative years. The roar of a tractor can be overheard as his father, Woody, enters the barn to hook to a wagon stacked high with square bales of hay.
    The scene is not unlike that of many Owen County farms – except the barn is also a horse arena, joined by 23 stalls filled with western horses. The hay will be used to feed those horses.
    It’s the same farm Stewart, 41, grew up on.  

  • Wet supporters look for chance to compete

    The driving force behind the Sept. 20 countywide wet-dry election is a group of citizens calling themselves “Give Owen County A Chance.”
    Its core members: Holly Bowling, Jason Wainscott, and Mike Haines.
    If successful, the three individuals are hopeful the sale of alcohol will give Owen County a chance to compete with surrounding counties, all of which are wet except for Scott County.

  • County holds line on taxes, discusses solid waste maintenance

    County taxpayers will see a slight decrease in their real property tax bills this October.
    The Owen County Fiscal Court approved a real property tax rate of 12.2 cents per $100 of assessed value during its Aug. 23 meeting, a slight decrease from 12.4 in 2015.
    Owen County Judge-Executive Casey Ellis recommended the court take the compensating rate.
    A motion was made by third-district magistrate Teresa Davis to approve the rate. Fourth-district magistrate Travis Fitzgerald seconded the motion.

  • State sporting clay event brings hundreds to hunt club

    BY MARLENE BROWNING-WAINSCOTT

    Special to the News-Herald

  • Dry forces begin organizing in an effort to defeat wet-dry election

    In a meeting that sometimes turned emotional Thursday night, a group of about 55 citizens filled the pews at Owenton First Baptist Church to begin organizing against the upcoming countywide wet-dry vote.
    Joshua Gibson, president of R.E.A.C.H. of Northern Kentucky, bowed his head as he expressed his disappointment in names he found on a petition of 656 signatures in support of the local-option election.

  • Petition, executive orders questioned at dry meeting

    During its first public meeting, members of Citizens For A Dry Owen County questioned the certification of a petition of 656 names filed last month for a countywide wet-dry election.
    Dave Jones, a realtor with Golden Triangle Realty and president of the Owen County Chamber of Commerce, said he recently met with Owen County Judge-Executive Casey Ellis, Owen County Clerk Laurel P. Stivers, and Owen County Attorney Josh Smith and presented what he believed were ineligible names and names signed on inappropriate dates to the elected officials.