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Local News

  • Despite snow, school still on schedule to end in May

    Because Owen County was hit with another wintery mess last week, local students will be in school until the end of May.
    Owen County Schools were closed Jan. 11, 12 and 13 due to snow.
    Combined with four snow-days in December, the students have now missed seven days of classes during this school year.
    Owen County Director of Pupil Personnel Charlotte Elkins said students will make up the days missed in December by attending May 20, 23, 24 and 25. And the makeup days for last week will be Feb. 21, May 26 and 27.

  • Rate hike announced by electricity provider

    The Kentucky Public Service Commission recently granted a rate increase to Winchester-based East Kentucky Power Cooperative, the wholesale electric power supplier for Owen Electric Cooperative and 15 other member cooperatives.
    The PSC approved the rate increase for service rendered on and after Jan. 14.
    According to a statement released by the company, EKPC sought the rate increase to “strengthen its financial condition and continue building equity.”

  • 'Beeting' back the snow

    As winter-weather warnings were being forecast for Owen County Monday, the Owen County road crew began preparing for another blast of snowy conditions.
    Monday morning, a winter weather advisory was issued for Owen County. As forecasted, the snow began Tuesday morning and was expected to continue through the early hours of today.
    Snow accumulations of two to four inches were expected by early today.

  • First bell at MBMS

    As the Owen County School District’s winter break came to an end, Maurice Bowling Middle School students and teachers were gearing up for Monday, the first day in a new facility.
    Owen County Schools Superintendent David Raleigh said despite a snowy December, workers were able to assist in making the move possible.
    “All things considered, I think everything went really well,” Raleigh said. “It was a team effort on everyone’s part. I’m very proud and very pleased with everyone’s work in making this possible.”

  • West calls for change of city attorney

    With just a few days under his belt as Owenton mayor, Doug West has announced he will not re-appoint the current Owenton city attorney.
    In a phone interview Monday, West said he has chosen to not re-appoint Mark Cobb as Owenton city attorney.
    West will recommend another local attorney, Mitzy Evans, to the post which advises the city on legal matters and potential litigation.
    The Owenton City Council must approve the nomination before Evans can assume the role.
    West said he wanted the city attorney to be more aggressive.

  • Christmas Eve meth arrests

    Two Owen County residents were arrested early Christmas Eve after law enforcement found nine “one-shot” methamphetamine labs at their home.
    According to Campbellsville Kentucky State Police Post Spokesman Michael B. Webb, Tammy Snell, 38, and Barry L. Snell, 47, were taken into custody about 2 a.m. Dec. 24 at 2140 Eagle Hill Road near Glencoe.
    An investigation by Kentucky State Police Trooper Justin Sams led to the home and to the arrests.

  • The News-Herald Year In Review

    As the first decade of the new millennium winds down, Owen County finds itself at a crossroads.
    With a shifting economy, a changing political scene and a new direction in local education, Owen countians are looking at the future while keeping an eye on preserving the past and the community’s rich heritage.
    The News-Herald looks back at 2010:

    Jan. 6: Jokes were made, tears were shed and stories were told Dec. 30 at Owenton First Christian Church when pastor Bill Watson and his wife, Brenda, sat before a crowd of friends and well-wishers.

  • Carter looks ahead as private attorney

    Long-time Owen County Attorney Charlie Carter will soon leave his post, but Owen countians can expect to continue seeing Carter active in law.
    Carter said when his term ends at the end of this month, it will end a near 25-year tenure.
    Prior to becoming county attorney, Carter’s private practice had been in operation for 25 years.
    Carter said his private practice will remain open, with his son, Charles Carter Jr., as an associate.
    As county attorney, Carter said he enjoyed district court the most.

  • Bruce wraps up his time at jail

    Even after retirement, sleep is not always an option.
    Owen County Jailer David Bruce learned this after retiring from the post office and becoming jailer 17 years ago.
    Now Bruce’s last term as jailer ends Dec. 31.
    He’ll be replaced by his daughter, Cindy Bruce-Walker, who defeated her opponent in the May primary to take the empty seat.
    Bruce said that over the years, the best part of his job has been helping others in a bad situation.

  • Hard times for Owen County Historical Society Museum

    Faces of Owen County’s past line the walls at the Owen County Historical Society Museum. Family snapshots, wedding photographs and pictures of local veterans are only a glimpse of Owen County’s rich past.

    Owen County Historical Society President Jeannie Williams-Baker said despite the history that awaits visitors at the museum, if more Owen countians don’t begin taking an interest, the museum could soon shut down.