.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • 4-H News: Volunteers reap benefits through program

    People of all ages can gain enormous satisfaction and other benefits by being a 4-H Youth Development volunteer in their communities.
    Teenage volunteers usually are older 4-H members. Volunteering helps teens build confidence, improve communications abilities and develop life skills. Youth volunteers do better in school, learn about career options, and sometimes develop new career goals. Those involved in community service consistently show improvement in mathematics and reading scores.

  • OCHS class of 1964 plans reunion

    From near and far, former classmates of Owen County High will come together once again in Owenton on April 12 when the school’s class of 1964 holds their 50th anniversary class reunion in the Owen County Extension Service’s community room at 357 Ellis Road. The class’s last reunion was held in September 2004.

  • Owen County students selected to join National Beta Club

    The Owen County High School Beta Society induction ceremony took place  March 18.
    Thirty-three new members were recognized and sworn into the society by chairman Randy Bishop and Mark McDaniel.
     Members are required to maintain a 3.25 or higher GPA. Members are also required to serve volunteer hours their junior and senior years. For eight volunteer hours, members will receive their black cords and 16 volunteer hours, members will receive both black and gold cords to be worn at graduation.

  • Legal ordinance fails to be published

    The City of Owenton has failed to publish at least one of its completed ordinances in The News-Herald, a violation of state law.
    The Owenton City Council approved an ordinance regulating the use of golf carts on city streets in January.
    The ordinance was never sent to the News-Herald for publication.

  • Murder case sparks second plea bargain

    A second man has plead guilty to lesser charges in the 2012 murder of a Franklin County man whose body was dumped on the side of Interstate 64.
    James Simons, 37, of Grant County, pleaded guilty to first-degree manslaughter, first-degree robbery, first-degree assault and tampering with physical evidence.
    Simons’ trial began March 17 but ended early on March 18 in a plea agreement.
    Simons was sentenced the same day to 25 years in prison. He will have to serve 17 years of his sentence before he will be eligible for parole.

  • Grant will fund monthly help for Owen Co. hungry

    The First Christian Church of Owenton has accepted a grant from the Cincinnati Freestore Foodbank to continue distributing food over the next three years in hopes of becoming a partnering agency with the Foodbank.
    The church had been distributing food four times a year, but with the grant will now distribute the third Saturday of every month through March 2015.
    After March 2015, a new schedule will be put into place.

  • Grant will fund monthly help for Owen Co. hungry

    The First Christian Church of Owenton has accepted a grant from the Cincinnati Freestore Foodbank to continue distributing food over the next three years in hopes of becoming a partnering agency with the Foodbank.
    The church had been distributing food four times a year, but with the grant will now distribute the third Saturday of every month through March 2015.
    After March 2015, a new schedule will be put into place.

  • Farm Bureau certifies three Owen County farm markets

    News-Herald
    Staff Report
    Owen County is home to three of the 104 certified farm markets across the commonwealth recently accepted into the 2014 Kentucky Farm Bureau Certified Roadside Farm Market Program. The Owen County members are: Ayres Family Orchard, Michels Family Farm, and Steepleview Farm.
    In joining the Kentucky Farm Bureau Certified Roadside Farm Market Program, these markets have committed to offering quality products and service to their customers.

  • Extension service celebrates centennial - 1946-1954

    The following is the fourth entry in a series of articles on the history of the extension service in Owen County.

    1946-1954
    By Dorris Gill and Kim Strohmeier

  • Pageant to benefit Relay for Life

    The second annual Queens for a Life Pageant will take place April 19 at 1 p.m. at the Owen County High School Auditorium.
    The deadline to enter is April 5 for a fee of $30.  There will be no door entries this year.
    This pageant is an open pageant to all counties that have contestants who wish to participate. 
    All proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society and Owen County Relay for Life. 
    If you would like to make a donation or sponsor an award, contact Rita Lathrem at 502-750-1928 or Brittany Clark at 502-514-5926.