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Local News

  • Who will get it?

    As the Owen-Gallatin County penny war comes to a close this week, one county judge-executive will have a pie in the face to look forward to.
    The announcement of the winner will take place at the Sparta Fall Festival Oct. 15.
    The festival is spearheaded by Colton Matt and Logan Bailey, two Maurice Bowling Middle School students. The two boys hope to raise enough money for renovations to the skate park at Sparta and have already collected $3,000, which has been matched by the Sparta City Council.

  • Postal officials looking for options to closing

    Following an announcement that one Owen County U.S. Post Office could close, the people of the community have now been given an opportunity to let their voice be heard.
    The U.S. Postal Service announced in July that it will “be taking the next step in right-sizing its expansive retail network by conducting studies of approximately 3,700 retail offices to determine customer needs.”
    The closures could affect the Perry Park post office.
    A spokesperson for the U.S. Postal Service, Cathy Yarosky, said the postal service nationwide is in dire financial straits for several reasons.

  • Changes come to two Owen Co. voting precincts

    As the Owen County Clerk’s Office transitions from summer to fall, we find ourselves preparing for the Nov. 8 General Election.
    As I think of our democratic process, I think of the progress we have made through the years. We have gone from hand-counted ballots, to now using the E-Slate and E-Scan machines. These voting machines allow for future growth of both voters and expanded ballot capabilities.
    On Election Day, we have a specially trained service technician who can perform on-site minor repairs and troubleshooting.

  • Crews working on the Natlee Bridge over Eagle Creek

    The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet announced a bridge-maintenance project has begun on the KY 607 bridge over Eagle Creek in Owen County. The project will encompass several maintenance improvements. The bridge deck will be restored and waterproofed and the bridge joints will be repaired.
    Rob Hans, chief district engineer for KYTC District 6 said, “These improvements and repairs on the bridge are an example of the cabinet’s commitment to improving safety and mobility on our highways and bridges.”

  • Seniors get in a groove

    Almost every Monday morning at the Owen County Senior Center, you can find a group of seniors drumming away their weekend. Some doctors believe this activity can lead to a general sense of well-being.
    The program, called Health Rhythms, is led by Roberta Schultz, who comes to the senior center to lead the seniors in approximately an hour of drumming.
    “It’s believed that anyone who participates in some sort of musical activity will be able to function better and feel better,” Schultz said. “It also helps create better eye and hand coordination.”

  • Kentucky’s dueling provision still draws laughs

    Kentucky Supreme Court Chief Justice John D. Minton Jr. was the special guest at Monday’s Rotary Club meeting and gave a detailed history of fighting a duel with a deadly weapon in Kentucky.
    Minton, who has served as the fifth Chief Justice of Kentucky since 2008, is the son of the late Dr. John D. Minton Sr. who retired from Western Kentucky University, having served there for many years as a history professor, administrator and its fifth president.

  • After plenty of prep, storm system comes to Owen County

    After months of preparation, Owen County is now being recognized by the National Weather Service’s StormReady Program.
    The StormReady program began in 1999 in Tulsa, Okla., and has helped to arm communities with the communication and safety skills needed to save lives and property before and during a weather-related event.
    Owenton Fire Chief David Lilly said to become StormReady, certain criteria are required throughout the United States. An evaluation is done to see if the community in question meets the specific criteria.

  • Program will quickly give information to police

    Owen County law enforcement will now have the ability to search for warrants right at their fingertips.
    Attorney General Jack Conway recently announced the successful implementation of an electronic warrant management system in the 15th judicial circuit, which includes Owen, Carroll and Grant counties.
    The Attorney General’s Office funded implementation of the system in the 15th judicial circuit under a $3.9 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act grant awarded to the office of the attorney general in 2009.
    Kentucky now has 101 counties utilizing the eWarrants system.

  • Crash kills one, seriously injures two

    By Lauren Hallow
    Kentucky News Content Service
    A man was killed and two women were injured in what police described as “a horrific crash” Friday night in Franklin County that may have been alcohol or drug related.

    Mikey S. Ward, 32, of Lawrenceburg, was driving south on U.S. 127 when he veered into the northbound lanes and struck another car head-on, according to Franklin County Sheriff Pat Melton.

    Ward had to be extricated from his car, a Mitsubishi Eclipse, and was pronounced dead in the ambulance en route to the hospital, Melton said.

  • Cummins named Green Scholar

    Taylor Cummins of Owen County High School has been named a State Sen. Jeff Green Scholar. Students earn this designation by achieving a 4.0 grade point average all four years of high school and scoring at least a 28 composite on the ACT.
    Cummins has also earned $2,500 a year in Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship awards. The award may be renewed each year of college if the student continues high scholastic achievement, making the total value of the KEES award worth $10,000.