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Local News

  • Owen Co. native offers invocation

    On April 19, Kentucky Wesleyan College in Owensboro held its honors and awards convocation.
    Owen County native Michael Kincaid delivered the invocation.
    He was also honored by receiving several achievement awards. He received the Edward L. Beavin Award, the Gilbert P. Robertson Pre-Ministerial Award and Who’s Who among Students In American Colleges And Universities.

  • Letter to the editor: Hammons deserves support

  • Students exercising their green thumbs with project

    Owen County High School sophomore Willie Johnson says the plants grown at the OCHS greenhouse bring happiness to anyone who purchases them, keeping the school’s greenhouse technology students focused on raising quality products.
    Students in the greenhouse technology class begin work in the greenhouse during late fall and by springtime are ready to sell vegetable plants and flowers.

  • Back in business

    By adding an extra sale day to its schedule, the Owen County Farmers’ Market hopes to bring in new customers and continue supporting the local economy.  
    The market will kick off its season at 10 a.m. Friday, May 11, with the annual Owen County judge-executive’s office ‘Cookout For A Cure’ with proceeds going toward Relay for Life.
    The Friday market will be held each Friday from 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
    Beginning June 12, the market will open on Tuesdays from 3-6 p.m.

  • Formal request made to change Ford zoning

    The future of well-known home on Owenton’s East Main Street could be decided in about 30 days.
    At a meeting of the Owenton planning and zoning board Monday, a formal request to change the zoning designation of the Ford house on East Main from R-1 (residential) to C-2 (commercial) was presented by the property owner Peggy Ford.
    The change would allow a commercial business to be opened on the property.
    Peggy Ford, who owns the property, said it would cost $500,000 to repair the house and $10-15,000 a year for upkeep.

  • Domestic case leads to drug indictment

    A convicted felon was recently indicted on methamphetamine charges after Owen County Sheriff Zemer Hammond was called to his residence over a domestic dispute.
    The incident took place during the afternoon hours April 20 at 1675 Hwy. 35. While at the residence Hammond said Kentucky State Trooper Dave Roberts stopped to see if everything was OK.

  • Three Rivers shines at conference

    Three Rivers District Health Department staff attended, participated and was recognized at the Kentucky Public Health Association’s 64th Annual Conference in March.
    The theme of this year’s conference was “ Where we’ve been. Where we are. Where we’re going.”
    Dr. Georgia Heise, public health director of Three Rivers District Health Department led a session titled ‘MAPPing Your Way to Accreditation.’

  • Carolyn Keith named Harris Fellow

    Carolyn Keith is the newest Paul Harris Fellow of the Owenton Rotary Club.
    Keith, who is a past president of Rotary and the current Owen County judge executive, was recently honored for her service to the community and to the Owenton Rotary Club.
    Keith is a longtime resident of Owen County and has worked tirelessly for its residents. 
    “I value my membership in the Owenton Rotary and especially value receiving the Paul Harris Award,” Keith, who has been a Rotarian for over 17 years, said.

  • Zone change sought for Ford House

    A fixture on the eastern entrance to Owenton could change if a proposed zone change is approved by the city.
    The Owenton planning and zoning committee will hold a public hearing Monday at 6 p.m., at Owenton City Hall to hear comments and concerns regarding proposed zone changes at 302 North Main Street and 311 South Main Street, known as the Ford House and the Goforth property.
    The committee is considering a request to change the designation from R1 (residential) to C1 (central business).

  • Primary Preview

    With the May primary looming ahead Owen County voters are sure to see changes in their state and federal government come November.
    Local voters will head to the polls on May 22 to narrow down the presidential, fourth congressional district for the U.S. house, state senator and state representative races.
    Earlier this year, Royce Adams, D-Dry Ridge, said he would not seek re-election to the 61st district state representative seat that he has held for 20 years.