.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Jones on patrol as Owenton's newest police officer

    Sometimes the road called life has a detour. For Jason Jones, the short detour is over and he is back to doing what he loves: law enforcement.
    Jones, was sworn in Aug. 2 as a part-time police officer for the City of Owenton. In addition to his police duties here, he is also a full-time 911 coordinator for the Gallatin County Communications Center.

    Earning the badge
    “I’ve always wanted to be a police officer,” he said.

  • Marston continues family's military tradition

    By Mattie Cook

    Special to the News-Herald

  • Former OCHS English instructor joins iLead Academy

    By Kristin Beck

    Landmark News Service

  • Threat lands conservation officer in jail

    A Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Conservation Officer assigned to Owen County was arrested last week after allegedly threatening to cut his ex-girlfriend’s boyfriend’s head off.

    The alleged incident began in the City of Owenton Aug. 1, when Jeremiah Denny, 37, of Sparta, forced a vehicle driven by his ex-girlfriend to stop with his own vehicle. Denny then exited his vehicle and threatened to cut the ex-girlfriend’s new boyfriend’s head off, according to a criminal complaint filed in the Owen County Circuit Clerk’s Office Aug. 2.

  • Deputies uncover meth operation

    An Owen County couple is behind bars after deputies discovered a large amount of methamphetamine or “ice” in their possession following a Thursday traffic stop.

    Owen County Sheriff’s Deputy Marvin Goodrich stopped to serve a warrant at the couple’s Highway 127 South residence for Dameon Denton, 25. While still in the area, Goodrich observed Sonya Lynch, 37, arriving at the residence to pick up another male subject to take him home.

  • Council hires new part-time police officer, approves resolution for police backup

    Following an executive session by the Owenton City Council Aug. 2, Mayor David “Milkweed” Wotier swore in Jason Jones, the city’s newest part-time police officer.

    Police Chief Terry Gentry said the department needed another officer after being short-staffed following the suspension of officer Rufus Shearer Jr. Out of all the applications the department had on file, Jones was the only one who currently held the Peace Officer Professional Standards certification and had been to the academy.

    “He was the top candidate,” Gentry said.

  • Sheriff warns against potential phone scams

    The Owen County Sheriff’s Office is warning residents about phone scams, the most recent one where callers claim to be from the IRS.

    Owen County Sheriff Mark Bess said he has been receiving reports about this type of scam call on an almost weekly basis. One form of the phone call alleges there are legal charges that need resolved.

    “The IRS is never ever going to call,” Bess said.

  • Former teacher takes on district-wide position

    Middle school science teacher, high school guidance counselor and alternative school principal are just a few of the titles Joretta Crowe has held during her 24-year career as an educator. Now, Crowe is beginning her 25th year in Owen County as the new director of districtwide programs.

    Crowe’s life-long pursuit of education is something that started when she was young.

    “I had two siblings that are younger, four and five years younger than I am, and I would sit there and teach them on a blackboard,” Crowe said.

  • Cole brothers bring home 12th at national high school rodeo

    More than 170 high school teams entered the team roping division at the 68th National High School Finals Rodeo last month in Gillette, Wyo. Two Owen County natives were able to bring home 12th place.

    Quinn Cole and Wyatt Cole had a time of 29.81 seconds in the dally team roping, according to the rodeo’s website.

    Greg Cole, Quinn and Wyatt’s father, said the two had a time of just over 7 seconds while qualifying for the “short go.” The top 20 qualifiers moved on to the finals.

  • Perkins still going strong

    BY LAUREN HOLLOWAY
    N-H Intern

    When you see Don Perkins and his wife Nancy in the tomato patch, it’s clear that there’s nothing he values more than family, his work and the outdoors.

    Perkins has been farming for as long as he can remember. Out of five brothers and three sisters, all of the boys grew up to be farmers.

    “Farming is in my family,” he said. “It was the only thing we all knew.”