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Around Owenton

  • City council rejects pick for attorney


    Despite a push from Owenton Mayor Doug West for a fresh face in the city attorney’s position, a motion was not made in favor of local attorney Mitzy Evans.
    On Jan. 3, West told the News-Herald that he had chosen to not re-appoint Owenton’s longtime city attorney, Mark Cobb, saying he would recommend Evans to the position.
    The Owenton City Council must approve any nomination before the nominee can assume the role.
    The council met Jan. 4, where no motion to appoint Evans was made.

  • Finding a financial footing

    Is one of your New Year’s resolutions going to be getting your finances in order?
    By the end of the month, do you wonder where your money has gone?
    Does it always feel as if there’s too much month left at the end of your money?
    If the answer to any of these questions is “Yes,” then it’s time to bring your checkbook back into control by attending Financial Peace University.

  • Wotier hopes pipeline will bring industry

    With natural gas now in the city of Owenton, Mayor David “Milkweed” Wotier hopes to see action in the industrial park.
    Wotier said Owenton’s lack of a natural gas line has hindered use of the spec building in the industrial park.
    “When we’ve had people look at the spec building in the past, they’ve been appalled that we didn’t have natural gas,” Wotier said. “Once the economy turns around, I think we’ll have more luck with our industrial park now that we have a natural gas line.”

  • Kay's Branch News

     Joel and Lou Ann were back at church after the bout with food poisoning. Joel said he went to Joey’s graduation from the training he completed. He has been sent to Missouri to a camp there for more seasoning. I don’t know what his plans are after that. 

  • Owen County’s Halloween Express turns scares into profit

    Ghosts, goblins and zombies have invaded the countryside as Halloween Express sets up shop across the nation.

    This multi-million dollar company has quickly become an Owen County icon.

    “Many people in Owen County make a living from Halloween,” Halloween Express President Curtis Sigretto said.

    From August to early November, Owen County families spread out across the country to make a living selling plastic masks and fake blood. Thousands of children turn to Owen County business owners to find the perfect trick-or-treat costume.

  • Five memorable months

    This Thursday evening, I will be reading at The Carnegie Center in Lexington in their “New Books by Great Writers” series. The Carnegie folks have billed me as a memoirist, and I’m relieved to have a label. I’m hard pressed to describe what I write when people ask. So I like being called a memoirist – it sounds literary and implies I know what I’m doing. Truth be told, if I’ve written a memoir, it happened by accident as I was jotting down glimpses I caught from the train window.

  • Smokey Mountains

    In August of 1956, Daddy observed that his tobacco crop needed another couple of weeks to yellow in the fields before cutting. If my mother and I wanted, he allowed as how he could slip away from the farm work for a few days, and we could join his sisters and their families on a short vacation trip to the Smokey Mountains.

  • REACH hosts parent’s night

    In an attempt to educate parents about the substances their children might encounter, REACH (Reaching Every Addict with Christ’s Help) is presenting a parent information night.

    On Thursday, Dwayne Rolfson of the Northern Kentucky Drug Strike Force will provide an overview of the drugs that officers are seeing on the streets of Northern Kentucky, including Owen County. He will offer parents the opportunity to ask questions and gain insight into how to prevent or stop their teen from participating in alcohol and drug use.