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Today's Features

  • Throughout the past year, colorful quilt squares have popped up all over on Owen County barns, signs and even one restaurant. Many are curious, but few know the rich history behind the farms and the patterns that adorn the individual barns.

    The Owen County Extension Homemakers have spent many hours researching and preserving the history of various quilt patterns. Their latest effort is a 50-page book containing information about each quilt square in Owen County.

  • Purchasing a class ring is often a monumental time in a high school student’s life. Worn as a symbol of pride for achieving goals in high school, it is a keepsake that provides many with remembrance of youthful days gone by.

    Two years ago, a letter was mailed to Owen County High School along with a 1958 OCHS class ring from McAuley High School in Cincinnati, Ohio.

    The letter read, “The enclosed ring was found in our old, old lost and found. Hope you can find the owner.”

  • When you walk into the Sweet Owen Store, it’s like taking a step back in time. Rocking chairs circle the potbelly stove, jars filled with old-fashioned candies sit near the cash register, bean soup and cornbread are served and the owners greet you with a smile. With a completely revamped look and new owners, the Sweet Owen Store is back and open for business.

    Owners Tom and Reggie Taggart opened the new Sweet Owen Store June 4. Breakfast and lunch are served daily and basic groceries – such as milk, bread and cold drinks – are sold.

  • On May 25, 15 Owen County High School seniors and their three chaperones ventured to the theater district of New York City on the third-annual senior drama class field trip.

    During their stay, students explored Times Square, Rockefeller Plaza, NBC Studios, Madam Tussauds Wax Museum, Fifth Avenue and 34th Street fashion districts, the Empire State Building, the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, the Statue of Liberty, Battery Park, Ground Zero, Wall Street, Financial District, Little Italy and Chinatown.

  • Most people just call her Miss Della, but after last week she can be called Dr. Jones.

    Della Jones, Grant County’s oldest resident at 105 years young – soon to be 106 in July – was given an honorary doctorate degree from Kentucky State University.

    “Do you want to wear a robe?” she was asked of the traditional graduation attire.

    “Well, of course,” she was quick to reply.

  • Cars lined both sides of Main Street in Owenton. The license plates spoke of homes from Kentucky to California; and as folks climbed from their vehicles, some dependent on the helping hand of a son or daughter, they cradled flowers in their arms. Owen County cemeteries from Monterey and New Liberty to Owenton were crowded Memorial Day weekend.

  • Just after having worked a couple of weeks at my new job, I soon discovered that a few of my coworkers knew all about Monterey. Seems they remember a few of their past coworkers also being from Monterey. While talking with Ms. Stella (Carriss) and Mike Harmon, another new employee (who has just recently come back, after having been in semi-retirement), I learned that they remember two Monterey ladies quite well. In fact they were sisters. They were Shirley (Smith) Ballard and Thelma (Smith) House. Everyone spoke very highly of the two and said I too, will do just fine.

  • I know the Kay’s Branch News wasn’t in the paper last week. I seemed to have misplaced a few days the week before. The sun came out that week and so did I. I washed windows, mowed the yard, washed more windows and mowed more yard. I got to play golf for the first time this year. Played badly but managed to finish 18 holes.

  • A cozy atmosphere and friendly faces bring customers to the recently expanded M&T Country Collectibles.

    The business opened in June of 2006, specializing in antiques. In 2007, the owner, Melissa Perkins, decided to completely revamp her store and do away with antiques.

    The business now specializes in country and primitive home décor and folk art, as well as many miscellaneous items such as Candleberry candles.

  • Owen County High School teacher Rusty Willhoite’s Technical Design and Application class has kept busy this year designing and building a hovercraft.

    The class recently completed the project, which was more than a year in the making and was a group effort by the class.

    Owen County School Superintendent Mark Cleveland said seven years ago he toured several schools in Indiana that incorporated robotics within the classroom. Cleveland was so awed by the classrooms that he had an industrial arts room built at OCHS.